Things that annoy you

skyblue1991

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Dec 19, 2012
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People relying on the barbers/hairdressers to provide face coverings

Get your own, you've had weeks!

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Walsgrave

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Apr 5, 2016
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Think I'll have to give that a read. Pretty much every company I've worked at you could remove the vast majority of the managers and directors with zero consequences.
Definitely do if you have the time. The only way that people people in positions of financial power get away with it is by using the argument that 'without us employing you, you wouldn't have a job'. When in reality the lowly paid worker could easily spin it back on them and say 'without me you would not have any income'.
In multiple schools I’ve seen bullshit leadership roles created just so people’s mates or ‘the right fit’ are put into senior positions.
Forgive my inner nosiness here - I remember you saying you worked at a certain Stoke school. Did they not have like 20 deputy heads at one point? :woot: 'Deputy head', 'Assistant head'... even 'Assistant Deputy head' etc. The finance manager must have had a busy year, and that probably explains why they lived beyond their means with the new buildings etc!
Nothing worse than gimps in high places who have no idea to do any of the jobs they are managing. It's pointless.
'Networking' is all that matters it seems nowadays, and it seems that if you want to keep to yourself and just do a good job, it's not good enough for the managers. I'm all for word-of-mouth recommendations - for instance, in small businesses where a family friend recommends a decent plumber - but then when you scale that up to the highest paid positions, it's all about what shoes you're wearing. Cringeworthy stuff.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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Jan 11, 2012
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Forgive my inner nosiness here - I remember you saying you worked at a certain Stoke school. Did they not have like 20 deputy heads at one point? :woot: 'Deputy head', 'Assistant head',, even 'Assistant Deputy head' etc. The finance manager must have had a busy year, and that probably explains why they lived beyond their means with the new buildings etc!
That would be correct. Various senior positions created for middle aged women friendly with the headteacher, middle management roles followed a similar vein too. The Girls’ Club didn’t do too well in handling my being assaulted in the classroom though and it took union involvement to achieve a response. A fair amount I could blow the whistle on for just a year there but just glad to be shot of it now.
 
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fernandopartridge

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Dec 9, 2011
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I'd like to think after all this has blown over how effential these people are to day to day living. All for a living wage.

Which brings me to another annoyance: people that look down on others because of their job. I'd like to think most arent like that but there people that treat supermarket staff, shop workers etc like shit. They are trying to earn a living in this world just like you and without them you would be screwed

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Couldn't agree more, snobbery over occupations is an import from America, I don't believe it was always this way
 

chiefdave

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Sep 27, 2008
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When in reality the lowly paid worker could easily spin it back on them and say 'without me you would not have any income'.
Not sure I'd count as lowly paid but if the lack of pay rises in the last decade continues I may be soon but as a worker its frustrating when you're doing work the clients are paying £75 - 150 an hour for and you're earning in the region of £15 an hour. Obviously companies have overheads but that doesn't really come into it when there's people at the top taking 6 figure salaries and hardly ever putting in an appearance let alone doing any work.

Don't know if its just my industry (I work in IT) but this has become a huge issue in the last 10 - 15 years. In that period the money going to those at the top seems to have shot up while the amount of work they do, or even the amount of hours they actually put in, has dropped. At the same time those actually doing the work hear 'you're lucky to have a job' as a reason for no pay rises, the end of bonus payments, and worsening conditions (most companies holiday entitlement seems to have dropped, overtime was replaced by TOIL which is now just work the extra hours as you're salaried, pension contributions dropped to the minimum allowed, other benefits such as healthcare, gym etc disappeared).

In real terms in the last 10 years my salary has dropped over £5K, holiday down from 30 days to 20, lost health and dental coverage, lost company gym membership, extra 10 hours minimum a week worked (if I ever had a week where I only worked my regular hours). Where does it end? Can see the current situation leading to more cuts with work being put onto those who still have jobs, already seen companies saying they will be letting people go as 'efficiency savings' as they've seen they can operate with less staff over this crisis.
 

Covstu

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Aug 17, 2008
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Costa del Cov
I've always hated the belittling of jobs as 'unskilled', mostly by people who think they're above it yet couldn't do it if their life depended on it.
Yep agree, when people can do a task in 2 mins it’s down to the level of experience and practice which then leads to a skill.i think lockdown has also highlighted how important these ‘unskilled’ jobs really are
 
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chiefdave

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That would be correct. Various senior positions created for middle aged women friendly with the headteacher, middle management roles followed a similar vein too.
This drives me mad as well. Especially when its people who are useless at their job who seem to keep getting promoted. Not so much the women thing but those who get promoted are generally the ones happy to brownnose - seems to be more important than actually being good at your job and getting on with the work.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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Jan 11, 2012
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This drives me mad as well. Especially when its people who are useless at their job who seem to keep getting promoted. Not so much the women thing but those who get promoted are generally the ones happy to brownnose - seems to be more important than actually being good at your job and getting on with the work.
It did give me an insight into what it must be like for women in the much more common opposite situation.
 

Nick

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Feb 25, 2008
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I've always hated the belittling of jobs as 'unskilled', mostly by people who think they're above it yet couldn't do it if their life depended on it.
I have respect for a lot of jobs, carers on minimum wage for example. Absolutely no chance I could do that.
 
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Walsgrave

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Apr 5, 2016
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That would be correct. Various senior positions created for middle aged women friendly with the headteacher, middle management roles followed a similar vein too. The Girls’ Club didn’t do too well in handling my being assaulted in the classroom though and it took union involvement to achieve a response. A fair amount I could blow the whistle on for just a year there but just glad to be shot of it now.
Must have been a nightmare. Christian values and all.
Not sure I'd count as lowly paid but if the lack of pay rises in the last decade continues I may be soon but as a worker its frustrating when you're doing work the clients are paying £75 - 150 an hour for and you're earning in the region of £15 an hour. Obviously companies have overheads but that doesn't really come into it when there's people at the top taking 6 figure salaries and hardly ever putting in an appearance let alone doing any work.

Don't know if its just my industry (I work in IT) but this has become a huge issue in the last 10 - 15 years. In that period the money going to those at the top seems to have shot up while the amount of work they do, or even the amount of hours they actually put in, has dropped. At the same time those actually doing the work hear 'you're lucky to have a job' as a reason for no pay rises, the end of bonus payments, and worsening conditions (most companies holiday entitlement seems to have dropped, overtime was replaced by TOIL which is now just work the extra hours as you're salaried, pension contributions dropped to the minimum allowed, other benefits such as healthcare, gym etc disappeared).

In real terms in the last 10 years my salary has dropped over £5K, holiday down from 30 days to 20, lost health and dental coverage, lost company gym membership, extra 10 hours minimum a week worked (if I ever had a week where I only worked my regular hours). Where does it end? Can see the current situation leading to more cuts with work being put onto those who still have jobs, already seen companies saying they will be letting people go as 'efficiency savings' as they've seen they can operate with less staff over this crisis.
Almost exactly my situation in one of my previous jobs - I was being charged out at £500 a day and pre-tax I was earning something in the region of £15 an hour. The attitudes of some of the people I worked with towards those who actually do meaningful jobs was bottom tier.
 

skybluesam66

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Mar 29, 2011
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A minimum a company should charge you out at 3 times your hourly rate. Probably nearer 4 unless you never have downtime.
 

Earlsdon_Skyblue1

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Dec 15, 2015
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I found myself nodding in agreement with pretty much every post on the last page or two.

I came back from America in 2013 and worked in hotels for a year or two. I've never worked so hard in my life or had to put up with so much shit. I got paid £6.31 an hour at that time and most of the bosses were horrible people that just looked down on us continuously.

I'm a business consultant now and whilst I'm more independent and do work hard, it's nothing like the shit I had to endure at the hotels. Get paid about 4 times more and it is more than 4 times less stressful.

The one thing I never understand is why people have to be such arses at work. There's always politics or problems, and they usually come from managers, or if they are from other staff then usually they are the brown nose types that try and put you down.

We have a bad working culture in this country and it is getting worse and worse. Covid-19 has also presented the perfect excuse for a lot of businesses to exploit their workforces even more too.
 

olderskyblue

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Mar 22, 2011
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Employees.
Whinging buggers that always think they put in as much effort as I do, as they don’t see that I’m still working hours after they’ve left. Oh, and that I invested all my life savings to start the bloody business, with the stress that comes with it.
When you try to educate them as to better ways to do their job, and they post on social media that their boss is “always on their back”. When they fall asleep at their computer during the day, and then moan to their mates that they never even get a break at work, ignoring their trips to the coffee machine, lunch, and popping outside for a ciggy.
All whilst on a decent wage.
employees. Never think that they might be crap, it’s always their boss.

:emoji_smile::emoji_smile::emoji_smile:
 

dubed

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Aug 14, 2012
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The one thing I never understand is why people have to be such arses at work. There's always politics or problems
In my experience within Government IT, this tension tends to between civil servant senior managers and IT firms/contractor cabals who have managed to impose themselves between managers and civil servant leadership. The amounts of money these firms and contactor cabals manage to suck up through their strategies of divide and conquer are sickening and can result in real damage lower down the civil servant ranks.

Personally, my working life and that of some of my colleagues have never been so bad. For the last 24 months, we've seen delivery dismantled and almost come to a stand-still whilst contractors holding senior positions use sub-contracting routes to flood the Directorate with (largely ineffective) contractors charged to the Department between 750-950 per day. The situation is so farcical that it's hard to say whether the civil service Director is part of the £30m brown-envelope chain or just so far up the Permanent Secretary's arse in seeking a further promotion that he can't see what's going on.
 

fernandopartridge

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Dec 9, 2011
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In my experience within Government IT, this tension tends to between civil servant senior managers and IT firms/contractor cabals who have managed to impose themselves between managers and civil servant leadership. The amounts of money these firms and contactor cabals manage to suck up through their strategies of divide and conquer are sickening and can result in real damage lower down the civil servant ranks.

Personally, my working life and that of some of my colleagues have never been so bad. For the last 24 months, we've seen delivery dismantled and almost come to a stand-still whilst contractors holding senior positions use sub-contracting routes to flood the Directorate with (largely ineffective) contractors charged to the Department between 750-950 per day. The situation is so farcical that it's hard to say whether the civil service Director is part of the £30m brown-envelope chain or just so far up the Permanent Secretary's arse in seeking a further promotion that he can't see what's going on.
Which sector are you in, if you don't mind saying?
My experience of this is that big consultancies are a comfort blanket for senior managers, who are as you say either former or current employees of similar consultancies.
They get away with the ridiculous day rates as they pay out of programme rather than admin budgets, pisses me off.
 

dubed

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Aug 14, 2012
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Yes, I'd probably go along with a needing a comfort blanket as being the reason. Unfortunately, this means they can't see that the comfort blanket is the problem, and so end up doubling up on that.

Department for Education, IT. I'll not say which Directorate :)
 

fernandopartridge

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Dec 9, 2011
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Yes, I'd probably go along with a needing a comfort blanket as being the reason. Unfortunately, this means they can't see that the comfort blanket is the problem, and so end up doubling up on that.

Department for Education, IT. I'll not say which Directorate :)
I used to work for the LSC / SFA a few years ago. I don't think the constant reorganising in that sector helps.
 

dubed

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Aug 14, 2012
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I used to work for the LSC / SFA a few years ago. I don't think the constant reorganising in that sector helps.
That's true. On average, we can expect a departmental or sub-departmental reorganisation every 24 months. LSC was a good example: split to create the SFA and YPLA, YLPA and all its IT systems get taken into another dept and becomes the EFA, only for SFA and EFA to be brought together under one department 4 years later, requiring these IT and business capabilities to be brought back together again.

As part of that, we had a facial gap year when there was an additional inter-departmental re-org to create a vanity project aimed at semi-privatisation of the IT layer, the result of which was the dismantling of IT and business capabilities that were probably on the path to level 3 now reduced to level 1. Four years later we are still at level 1.

I'm afraid that's why you get the civil service culture of "whatever - at least I've got my pension and a reasonably secure job". Good people, beaten down by the vanities and politics that starts at the very top.
 
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Mcbean

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Jul 17, 2015
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You know on Facebook it says people you may know and they are friends of friends that you had no idea existed and this I see one phew she’s a looker where did I miss her in my activities and then you realise it’s people they are suggesting you might want to follow not actually someone you may be connected with ! I was getting excited F226099F-44EC-4B12-AF8F-2F869F43B4F8.png
 

ccfc92

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Jul 7, 2012
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Mouth ulcers.

Constant pain and effects you eating/drinking too.

Bastards.
 

hill83

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Sep 15, 2008
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Mouth ulcers.

Constant pain and effects you eating/drinking too.

Bastards.
I used to get them when I was out every night in my early 20s.



The above instantly resolves the issue and I mean instantly. Couldn't recommend any other product for anything else as highly. Looks like it's tricky to get hold of these days though. I used to order on amazon and they come from USA I think.
 
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fernandopartridge

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Dec 9, 2011
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They don't know what actually causes mouth ulcers but like others I used to get them if I'd been on the piss. Not had one for months!
 
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ajsccfc

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Dec 10, 2008
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I get them fairly regularly and they're usually an inconvenience but it depends where they position themselves, most recent one was a proper bastard and seemed to last ages. Tried bonjela which numbs it temporarily but if that stuff just kills them I'm stocking up
 
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hill83

Well-Known Member
Sep 15, 2008
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Honestly. It's mental. The solution is in a hollow cotton bud, you snap one end it it drains into the cotton bud on one end.
Put it on the ulcer and hold it on. The pain is worse than a kick in the bollocks but make sure you do it for long enough. And that's it. No more pain, the area turns white and numb for a bit then clears up. It essentially burns it away.

Found a link for it
 
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