Mental Health

Brighton Sky Blue

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A big problem people have with mental health problems is actually accepting they have them in the first place... Took me a couple years to finally accept I wasn't very well.
But the biggest problem is thinking you can cure it and make it go away forever, and becoming extremely agitated that it's not happening which can make you Spiral... For me, you can never truly get rid of mental health problems, only manage them... People need to accept that before they can make peace with themselves.. It's a horrible thing to have..

Accept it, embrace it, and get that thing under control... It's all you can do.
I find it hard when I see no light at the end of the tunnel. I'm OK at handling shorter term setbacks but it's times like these when there doesn't seem to be an end in sight that I struggle to be resilient. Normally it'd just be 'get through to the next break' but it just seems like I'm hoping for time to speed up and to get through the day that way.
 

Evo1883

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Cant remember the company name now TBF. Guy was outstanding though. Not enough normal therapists.
The reason I ask is my dad did this work, but no longer does... Was an alcoholic... And ofcourse a cov lad
 
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Earlsdon_Skyblue1

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I am fine thanks but hearing from, or about, a lot of people that aren't.
The mental health impact of this situation seems to be starting to hit home.
Glad to hear it.

I've noticed it too. I know someone that does counselling and she said that it is the busiest since she started doing it. It was only a gig on the side but now it is basically full time. Apparently last lockdown she had to shut down, exactly like many of the other mental health workers. Staggering really.
 

clint van damme

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Glad to hear it.

I've noticed it too. I know someone that does counselling and she said that it is the busiest since she started doing it. It was only a gig on the side but now it is basically full time. Apparently last lockdown she had to shut down, exactly like many of the other mental health workers. Staggering really.
People were talking about the effect during the initial lockdown but I don't think it really hit home then, (I may be wrong but that's the impression I got).

The weather was glorious, life slowed down, I think it was a bit of a novelty.
Seems much worse now, or perhaps it an accumulation that's been building for months. Either way we really need this vaccine. It will be a massive blow if for any reason it doesn't work out.

Strangely, as someone with zero confidence in the government I think they'll get this right, (maybe wishful thinking)
 
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Brighton Sky Blue

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People were talking about the effect during the initial lockdown but I don't think it really hit home then, (I may be wrong but that's the impression I got).

The weather was glorious, life slowed down, I think it was a bit of a novelty.
Seems much worse now, or perhaps it an accumulation that's been building for months. Either way we really need this vaccine. It will be a massive blow if for any reason it doesn't work out.

Strangely, as someone with zero confidence in the government I think they'll get this right, (maybe wishful thinking)
It’ll be done right because others have made it and others will distribute it.
 

clint van damme

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It’ll be done right because others have made it and others will distribute it.
Yeah, Obviously they won't actually develop it but they'll be involved in who to prioritise and the distribution but hopefully that side goes well.

I can't allow myself to think of the consequences if this turns into another debacle like the PPE.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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Yeah, Obviously they won't actually develop it but they'll be involved in who to prioritise and the distribution but hopefully that side goes well.

I can't allow myself to think of the consequences if this turns into another debacle like the PPE.
There is a logistical hurdle in keeping it at such a low temperature, but I suppose if you transported it in liquid nitrogen that’d do
 

clint van damme

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There is a logistical hurdle in keeping it at such a low temperature, but I suppose if you transported it in liquid nitrogen that’d do
I did wonder about that. How many goods currently get shipped around at -70?
But surely they wouldn't have said anything if that wasn't feasible?
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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I did wonder about that. How many goods currently get shipped around at -70?
But surely they wouldn't have said anything if that wasn't feasible?
In the past I have had temperature sensitive chemicals delivered that way but I can’t think of much else. Are sperm samples transported at that temperature?
 

clint van damme

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In the past I have had temperature sensitive chemicals delivered that way but I can’t think of much else. Are sperm samples transported at that temperature?
Just googled, apparently the distribution and storage at minus 70 is a challenge.

Typically refrigerated distribution currently goes to temperatures of minus 42.
So there's a big challenge ahead. Come on you fridge bastards - make it happen!
 
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jimmyhillsfanclub

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here
I've read that vaccine has a 5 day shelf life when stored in a standard lab freezer @ -20C.

So they will have to have a distribution network of -70C hub freezers feeding the vaccination centres that can hold it for up to 5 days in more standard equipment.

ULT refrigeration is a challenge....its what I do❄❄😎
It almost always requires a cascade system where a primary loop cools a secondary loop......and of course, its not just about reaching the lower temperatures, its also about being able to cope with the heatload at those ULTs.

F-gas regulations may also impact the ability to make larger ULT systems as the specialty gases have a huge GWP and therefore are usually limited to small gas charges of <2.75KG.....ZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Sorry.....I'll stop now.....wakey wakey folks.
 

MusicDating

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I find it hard when I see no light at the end of the tunnel. I'm OK at handling shorter term setbacks but it's times like these when there doesn't seem to be an end in sight that I struggle to be resilient. Normally it'd just be 'get through to the next break' but it just seems like I'm hoping for time to speed up and to get through the day that way.
I've noticed your posts on the Coronovirus thread have sounded more down recently BSB. Do speak to someone / get help if you do find yourself struggling.

I've been very fortunate in my life in that I haven't suffered from mental health issues, but I'm not pretending it wouldn't happen to me. My problem is close family do and I struggle trying to understand what it's like to suffer and feel pretty helpless in my efforts in trying to help.
 
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Brighton Sky Blue

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I've noticed your posts on the Coronovirus thread have sounded more down recently BSB. Do speak to someone / get help if you do find yourself struggling.

I've been very fortunate in my life in that I haven't suffered from mental health issues, but I'm not pretending it wouldn't happen to me. My problem is close family do and I struggle trying to understand what it's like to suffer and feel pretty helpless in my efforts in trying to help.
It’s mostly because my workload went up a lot when we switched to remote learning . It hasn’t changed since the school return since I am essentially having to rewrite a practical curriculum to be delivered with little practical work possible. That and the added restrictions around staying in a box, changing rooms every lesson and so on have made it worse.

As my OH is also a teacher we’re finding it hard to support each other due to the workload. Friends and family with the luxury of working at home all day don’t quite understand although they try. All this ongoing since March when I was burned out by then anyway and I’m more tense and pessimistic than I can remember
 
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hill83

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People were talking about the effect during the initial lockdown but I don't think it really hit home then, (I may be wrong but that's the impression I got).

The weather was glorious, life slowed down, I think it was a bit of a novelty.
Seems much worse now, or perhaps it an accumulation that's been building for months. Either way we really need this vaccine. It will be a massive blow if for any reason it doesn't work out.

Strangely, as someone with zero confidence in the government I think they'll get this right, (maybe wishful thinking)
I’ve been saying the same. As shit as the first lockdown was it was a novelty and a bit of a laugh. Doesn’t seem like it was for as long as it actually was looking back. This one seems longer already. The taste of freedom for a few weeks and the fact it’s winter has made this one much more of a struggle.
 

Grendel

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It’s mostly because my workload went up a lot when we switched to remote learning . It hasn’t changed since the school return since I am essentially having to rewrite a practical curriculum to be delivered with little practical work possible. That and the added restrictions around staying in a box, changing rooms every lesson and so on have made it worse.

As my OH is also a teacher we’re finding it hard to support each other due to the workload. Friends and family with the luxury of working at home all day don’t quite understand although they try. All this ongoing since March when I was burned out by then anyway and I’m more tense and pessimistic than I can remember
Joking apart you may need to look at a new career - there’s no point in getting continually stressed over work - life is too short
 

MusicDating

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It’s mostly because my workload went up a lot when we switched to remote learning . It hasn’t changed since the school return since I am essentially having to rewrite a practical curriculum to be delivered with little practical work possible. That and the added restrictions around staying in a box, changing rooms every lesson and so on have made it worse.

As my OH is also a teacher we’re finding it hard to support each other due to the workload. Friends and family with the luxury of working at home all day don’t quite understand although they try. All this ongoing since March when I was burned out by then anyway and I’m more tense and pessimistic than I can remember
Yer, that does sound like a shitshow tbh. It's like it was just too hard for the Govt to figure out how teachers were going to do practical work, so they've just ignored it!

Of course the vaccine is the great hope and it does seem to be arriving sooner rather than later which is cause for optimism. Other than than, avoid news/social media and make the most of the time you can find to spend with your OH. Revisit some of the things you did before 2020 (y)
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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Yer, that does sound like a shitshow tbh. It's like it was just too hard for the Govt to figure out how teachers were going to do practical work, so they've just ignored it!

Of course the vaccine is the great hope and it does seem to be arriving sooner rather than later which is cause for optimism. Other than than, avoid news/social media and make the most of the time you can find to spend with your OH. Revisit some of the things you did before 2020 (y)
Well fingers crossed this vaccine or another one allows us to have a normal wedding next summer. That’s pretty much what’s keeping us going
 
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GaryMabbuttsLeftKnee

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I actively am but it’s difficult finding one at a similar pay in my field without a PhD as a basic requirement
Having similar problems but in a different field. Work life is ridiculous. We got rid of people but the workload never changed. Work in Digital Marketing at the moment, have done fairly well, not excellently by any stretch, in it, but studied Economics at university and always wanted to go into finance. For one reason or another, didn't get jobs having got fairly far in a few grad schemes. They took a few months to go through so by the end was just happy for an 'Office job'. Every time I looked to leave I would get a little payrise or would be promoted into the next 'tier' as it were, that would keep me there for a year or so. At the start of last year I committed to retraining and started doing CIMA. A year and half down I have passed the first stage (of four) and half way through the next one. Have known I wouldn't get my current rate of pay so was happy to drop a bit and have applied for higher end graduate jobs or less experienced, and still not getting a look in. There appears to be plenty of jobs in finance too.

Having a hard time of it coming to terms with being in my 30s and having zero route or career path to currently be on. I'm someone who likes structure and goals to reach, but even with the exams now I have found myself becoming a bit 'Is there any point if no one is going to take a chance to even interview me (which in itself is something I am shit with).' Life can be tough.
 
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chiefdave

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A big problem people have with mental health problems is actually accepting they have them in the first place... Took me a couple years to finally accept I wasn't very well.
The problem I find is actually working out what is 'normal' and what is actually an issue. Pretty sure everyone has stress and anxiety in their life so at what point have you crossed a line and need to do something about it?

I can certainly see anxiety issues running through my Mums side of the family but tend to just accept them as one of those things as its something I've had all my life and saw in my Mum and Grandad as I was growing up. Makes you view it as 'normal' behaviour.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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Having similar problems but in a different field. Work life is ridiculous. We got rid of people but the workload never changed. Work in Digital Marketing at the moment, have done fairly well, not excellently by any stretch, in it, but studied Economics at university and always wanted to go into finance. For one reason or another, didn't get jobs having got fairly far in a few grad schemes. They took a few months to go through so by the end was just happy for an 'Office job'. Every time I looked to leave I would get a little payrise or would be promoted into the next 'tier' as it were, that would keep me there for a year or so. At the start of last year I committed to retraining and started doing CIMA. A year and half down I have passed the first stage (of four) and half way through the next one. Have known I wouldn't get my current rate of pay so was happy to drop a bit and have applied for higher end graduate jobs or less experienced, and still not getting a look in. There appears to be plenty of jobs in finance too.

Having a hard time of it coming to terms with being in my 30s and having zero route or career path to currently be on. I'm someone who likes structure and goals to reach, but even with the exams now I have found myself becoming a bit 'Is there any point if no one is going to take a chance to even interview me (which in itself is something I am shit with).' Life can be tough.
I did part of my degree with a big pharmaceutical company. Ordinarily that would have led to being secure a graduate job with them after, but as it was still close to the recession none of the schemes were available. So I ended up in academia for a while, couldn’t stand it (another toxic work life balance) and moved to teaching. Which just seems to have worse conditions imposed year on year
 

fernandopartridge

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I’ve been saying the same. As shit as the first lockdown was it was a novelty and a bit of a laugh. Doesn’t seem like it was for as long as it actually was looking back. This one seems longer already. The taste of freedom for a few weeks and the fact it’s winter has made this one much more of a struggle.
The daylight makes a difference too, the last one coincided with clocks going forward, this one the other way.
 

chiefdave

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It’s mostly because my workload went up a lot when we switched to remote learning . It hasn’t changed since the school return since I am essentially having to rewrite a practical curriculum to be delivered with little practical work possible. That and the added restrictions around staying in a box, changing rooms every lesson and so on have made it worse.

As my OH is also a teacher we’re finding it hard to support each other due to the workload. Friends and family with the luxury of working at home all day don’t quite understand although they try. All this ongoing since March when I was burned out by then anyway and I’m more tense and pessimistic than I can remember
I work in a very different field to you but that all sounds very familiar. Only been back in for a few weeks and already I could happily re-enact Falling Down!

My company got rid of about 50% of the frontline staff, oddly no managers or directors were deemed surpluses to requirements, when the furlough scheme initially wasn't extended. And of those that remain its heavily weighted towards those in the most junior positions, ie the cheapest to employ, who with the best will in the world can only do the most basic tasks.

Of course the workload hasn't really changed so its just more work being pushed onto those who are left. Already getting complaints about the backlog of work and how long it is taking to begin work on things. Pointed out we needed more staff and got told I was wrong and we just needed to work smarter whatever that is supposed to mean.

Although covid has been blamed its just a continuation of what has been happening in the last 10-15 years. Wage stagnation while everything else is stripped away. First overtime was replaced by TOIL and then TOIL went. My contract might say 40 hours a week but I can't remember the last time I had a 40 hour week. Benefits chipped away at until the final ones fell away at the start of covid so just left with literally the minimum possible in terms of pension and no other benefits.

Being on furlough really showed how much of an impact work has on my mental and physical health. Didn't take long for things to return to how they were. Even in times that you can't see your mates just speaking to them on the phone they've noticed a difference since I've been back at work but as others have said when you're in your forties a career change can be tricky. Even if you can work out what you want to do and find someone that will employ you in that field there's a limit to how much you can drop your salary and still be able to pay the mortgage.
 
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Brighton Sky Blue

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I work in a very different field to you but that all sounds very familiar. Only been back in for a few weeks and already I could happily re-enact Falling Down!

My company got rid of about 50% of the frontline staff, oddly no managers or directors were deemed surpluses to requirements, when the furlough scheme initially wasn't extended. And of those that remain its heavily weighted towards those in the most junior positions, ie the cheapest to employ, who with the best will in the world can only do the most basic tasks.

Of course the workload hasn't really changed so its just more work being pushed onto those who are left. Already getting complaints about the backlog of work and how long it is taking to begin work on things. Pointed out we needed more staff and got told I was wrong and we just needed to work smarter whatever that is supposed to mean.

Although covid has been blamed its just a continuation of what has been happening in the last 10-15 years. Wage stagnation while everything else is stripped away. First overtime was replaced by TOIL and then TOIL went. My contract might say 40 hours a week but I can't remember the last time I had a 40 hour week. Benefits chipped away at until the final ones fell away at the start of covid so just left with literally the minimum possible in terms of pension and no other benefits.

Being on furlough really showed how much of an impact work has on my mental and physical health. Didn't take long for things to return to how they were. Even in times that you can't see your mates just speaking to them on the phone they've noticed a difference since I've been back at work but as others have said when you're in your forties a career change can be tricky. Even if you can work out what you want to do and find someone that will employ you in that field there's a limit to how much you can drop your salary and still be able to pay the mortgage.
Our mortgage is north of a grand a month without the other bills. At this point my aim is to get to the highest point of the pay scale and then go down to 3 or 4 days out of 5. Should make it there in 2-3 years and reclaim the balance while still being enough to keep things going.

Funny you mention Falling Down, I love that film but it’s only this year I’ve actually appreciated how on message it is.
 

Skybluefaz

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If it gives anybody hope I switched careers in my 30's. Started studying part time with the OU when I hit 30, ditched my decent paying retail manager job. Slogged a couple of years on a night shift at Sainsburys while studying but then got my first developer job when I was 33. Now I'm in the final year of Uni Bsc Computing and IT and I'm onto my second job in software/web development. I'm still short of what I was getting paid, but that will come. It is possible.
 

shmmeee

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Joking apart you may need to look at a new career - there’s no point in getting continually stressed over work - life is too short
Thats what I did. Realised as much as I loved teaching it wasn’t worth the mental toll. Am much happier and less stressed (and better paid) in the private sector.

Big jump though and a lot of employers don’t recognise the transferable skills of teachers.
 
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Earlsdon_Skyblue1

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Been fine up until this week, been ploughing through it and finishing writing my book to keep my mind busy. Feel like I have completely lost it in the last week or so though, today has just about topped it off.

Without trying to sound dramatic or like one of those facebook mum's, I'm really not in a good place and I Just don't really know what to do. Route cause of course comes back to the female situation, but the lockdown is making it hard for me to trust myself on what is getting me down or to what extent the lockdown is amplifying it.
 

Grendel

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Thats what I did. Realised as much as I loved teaching it wasn’t worth the mental toll. Am much happier and less stressed (and better paid) in the private sector.

Big jump though and a lot of employers don’t recognise the transferable skills of teachers.
Some things suit some and not others.

I had a job managing retailer sales and thought it was a right laugh. A mate of mine who was a nice guy just could not cope. Lost his girlfriend worked hours and hours and ended up having a total meltdown which cumulated in him revving his car outside a showroom and screaming and swearing - the dealer thought he was going to drive through the glass front.
 
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Greggs

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Fucking gyms closed again, anyone for a Fight Club at mine?