Mental Health

hill83

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Sep 15, 2008
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don't want to sound like a fool, but starting to give up on life and love, sometimes i feel like I'm not good enough for anyone. feel alone from time to time when i over think it does serious damage, don't seem to be able to snap out of it either, considering seeing some one regarding my issues as ive tried a few things in the past just seems like past couple of weeks its hit me hardest. my mind set is all over the place. im normally a happy go lucky guy bubbly and fun but soemthing seems to be sapping the goodness out of me at the moment.
You definitely don't sound like a fool. It will worth looking into finding someone to talk to. It's a big step and for sure and I'd probably struggle to do it myself, but even your post itself is a start.
 

Bugsy

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Aug 13, 2012
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You definitely don't sound like a fool. It will worth looking into finding someone to talk to. It's a big step and for sure and I'd probably struggle to do it myself, but even your post itself is a start.


thanks Hill, wasn't going to post anything just thought id get it out my head. i will be making a few inquires into seeing a specialist at some point this week as its getting abit out of hand and could do with clearing a few webs from my head.

dont suppose anyone knows any good practices or recommendations regarding mental health, i know theres afew about just wondered if there were any around coventry

fair play to yourself aswell under your circumstances its never easy to deal with marriage breakups. at the best of times.
 

shmmeee

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Jul 11, 2011
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thanks Hill, wasn't going to post anything just thought id get it out my head. i will be making a few inquires into seeing a specialist at some point this week as its getting abit out of hand and could do with clearing a few webs from my head.

dont suppose anyone knows any good practices or recommendations regarding mental health, i know theres afew about just wondered if there were any around coventry

fair play to yourself aswell under your circumstances its never easy to deal with marriage breakups. at the best of times.
My experience is: try a few and find a therapist you get on with. I had success with a private CBT practitioner, won’t name him as I don’t think he’s still doing it sadly. But he was nothing like the flowery mumsy women you normally get that I didn’t get on with at all. Former alcoholic and Cov lad. Helped me massively once I found someone I respect.
 
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Covstu

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Aug 17, 2008
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Costa del Cov
This year I've been through a marriage breakup, obviously this pandemic shite, a substantial pay cut at work and my dad having health issues, so it's been a shit year. Barely seeing my son now is probably the hardest part.

But I actually feel like I'm coming out the other side of it now. Started lifting weights again, stopped drinking so much and just trying to think positively. So feel pretty good at the moment. Also trying not to get bogged down with internet bollocks, including on here and trying to not watch Cov games this season as we are fucking shite and getting our arses handed to us so far.
I must admit switching off from the news and social media is a major aspect. There is literally nothing positive there apart from people selling you their side of the argument (even when there is no argument to be had!). This in itself is soul destroying
 
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Covstu

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thanks Hill, wasn't going to post anything just thought id get it out my head. i will be making a few inquires into seeing a specialist at some point this week as its getting abit out of hand and could do with clearing a few webs from my head.

dont suppose anyone knows any good practices or recommendations regarding mental health, i know theres afew about just wondered if there were any around coventry

fair play to yourself aswell under your circumstances its never easy to deal with marriage breakups. at the best of times.
Had to go on a course a while back but one of the more practical tips is around routine. Sounds daft and simple but write down and things you want/need to achieve day by day. I’m not talking shite like speaking a new language, run a marathon etc it needs to be more basic than that such as cut the grass, clean the kitchen, go walk 10,000 steps. Obviously it varies given the level of depression the individual is in but it’s about winning small battles which then becomes habitual and second nature. One you can adapt and grow but it’s really effective in tackling a shite state of mind and applying focus
 

Sky_Blue_Daz

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Mar 20, 2011
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Good luck Daz. This next month will definitely take it's toll on some people.
If it does, people got to keep reaching out - we will get through it!!
To be honest mate looking at the questionnaire I think they deal with way worse situations the me , but I’m open to any suggestions or strategies they can offer
 

clint van damme

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To be honest mate looking at the questionnaire I think they deal with way worse situations the me , but I’m open to any suggestions or strategies they can offer
I'm sure that's the case. But I'm sure you'll.get something from it that will give you and your family a bit of reassurance.
 
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Nick

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Feb 25, 2008
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thanks Hill, wasn't going to post anything just thought id get it out my head. i will be making a few inquires into seeing a specialist at some point this week as its getting abit out of hand and could do with clearing a few webs from my head.

dont suppose anyone knows any good practices or recommendations regarding mental health, i know theres afew about just wondered if there were any around coventry

fair play to yourself aswell under your circumstances its never easy to deal with marriage breakups. at the best of times.
Book an appointment with your doctor as well, just to see if there's anything they can do.
 
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hill83

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Sep 15, 2008
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I’ll start most of my posts the same way with, I’ve had a beer.

But I genuinely feel like I’ve got mates on here, not including the people I actually know, so thanks.
 
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Ccfcisparks

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May 13, 2011
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Lockdown 2 and the result last night has left me feeling shite today, don’t think I’d be arsed about the Cov result if there was something to do to take my mind off it.
 

clint van damme

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Lockdown 2 and the result last night has left me feeling shite today, don’t think I’d be arsed about the Cov result if there was something to do to take my mind off it.
Cheer up mate. Things can only get better!
It's a nice evening, how about a nice walk?
 

Mucca Mad Boys

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Jul 26, 2012
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It’s good to read stuff like this, in a weird way. I had a bout of anxiety at university in my final year. I generally lost interest in everything; rugby, football and did not care if I failed at university.

Eventually, it took for my then girlfriend to express her concerns to my mum. Who called me just outside a restaurant where my team was having a get together for team bonding as part of our varsity preparation. I was holding back tears. A week later, had to deal with a breakup just as I’d arranged to see a counsellor.

Anyway, things that helped me through my battle of beating my ‘wobble’. Stoic philosophy and teachings helped as a coping mechanism, and put some perspective on life. At this time, Tyson Fury’s Joe Rogan podcast appearance was inspiring, and equally harrowing (I seen him as a drunken mess weeks before he came out with his issues). Also, generally drinking less, procrastinating less and for me, getting out of academia and into the work place gave a lot more structure to my life and that helped a lot.

This is my third year of doing Movember properly, so I’m going to leave my fundraising link at the bottom here.

Perhaps in 2021, we could do an SBT fundraiser too!

Please donate, if you can:

 

wingy

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Jul 9, 2011
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It’s good to read stuff like this, in a weird way. I had a bout of anxiety at university in my final year. I generally lost interest in everything; rugby, football and did not care if I failed at university.

Eventually, it took for my then girlfriend to express her concerns to my mum. Who called me just outside a restaurant where my team was having a get together for team bonding as part of our varsity preparation. I was holding back tears. A week later, had to deal with a breakup just as I’d arranged to see a counsellor.

Anyway, things that helped me through my battle of beating my ‘wobble’. Stoic philosophy and teachings helped as a coping mechanism, and put some perspective on life. At this time, Tyson Fury’s Joe Rogan podcast appearance was inspiring, and equally harrowing (I seen him as a drunken mess weeks before he came out with his issues). Also, generally drinking less, procrastinating less and for me, getting out of academia and into the work place gave a lot more structure to my life and that helped a lot.

This is my third year of doing Movember properly, so I’m going to leave my fundraising link at the bottom here.

Perhaps in 2021, we could do an SBT fundraiser too!

Please donate, if you can:

Sounds like a combination of anxiety coupled with depression to be fair good to hear you got out of it .
The stoic side is interesting .
Roughly for 30 years my problems came from a reactive depression from a life event.
My whole resilience evaporated ,which had been there in spades up until that point .
Probably had 3 breakdowns since that time .
Inefficiently and ineffectively trying to deal with the pitfalls of my life until I got to 61 and it all collapsed in and finally got treatment ,which I did seek at the initial point but for whatever reason I didn't articulate or the GP didn't realise where I was at.
 

Mucca Mad Boys

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Sounds like a combination of anxiety coupled with depression to be fair good to hear you got out of it .
The stoic side is interesting .
Roughly for 30 years my problems came from a reactive depression from a life event.
My whole resilience evaporated ,which had been there in spades up until that point .
Probably had 3 breakdowns since that time .
Inefficiently and ineffectively trying to deal with the pitfalls of my life until I got to 61 and it all collapsed in and finally got treatment ,which I did seek at the initial point but for whatever reason I didn't articulate or the GP didn't realise where I was at.
It probably was, I was certainly in a rut at this time, 100%. There is something about University life that breeds negative mental health issues. At a guess, excessive drinking (plus other substances) and lack of a daily routine/structure impacts most students.

I’d recommend picking up some Stoic literature - or even YouTube Stoicism as an introduction. I’m not religious, at all. But, the principles of Christianity and particularly Buddhism are similar to the Stoics. As a history graduate, I do think there are some fundamental truths buried in ancient wisdom - harsher times.

I’m glad you’re on the up and got the treatment you needed! Thankfully, with mental health issues being publicised and the stigma gradually being removed, people will find it easier to talk to a GP and get help.

As a side note: a big thank you to the anonymous donor to my Movember page! Every £ helps!
 
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wingy

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It probably was, I was certainly in a rut at this time, 100%. There is something about University life that breeds negative mental health issues. At a guess, excessive drinking (plus other substances) and lack of a daily routine/structure impacts most students.

I’d recommend picking up some Stoic literature - or even YouTube Stoicism as an introduction. I’m not religious, at all. But, the principles of Christianity and particularly Buddhism are similar to the Stoics. As a history student, I do think there are some fundamental truths buried in ancient wisdom - harsher times.

I’m glad you’re on the up and got the treatment you needed! Thankfully, with mental health issues being publicised and the stigma gradually being removed, people will find it easier to talk to a GP and get help.

As a side note: a big thank you to the anonymous donor to my Movember page! Every £ helps!
I'm not really up on the stoicism, but strangely enough my YT feed popped up some Alan Watts lecture's .
Found them fascinating.
Listened to around three up to now
Thanks for the tips .

Will venture deeper .
 
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wingy

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Jul 9, 2011
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It probably was, I was certainly in a rut at this time, 100%. There is something about University life that breeds negative mental health issues. At a guess, excessive drinking (plus other substances) and lack of a daily routine/structure impacts most students.

I’d recommend picking up some Stoic literature - or even YouTube Stoicism as an introduction. I’m not religious, at all. But, the principles of Christianity and particularly Buddhism are similar to the Stoics. As a history graduate, I do think there are some fundamental truths buried in ancient wisdom - harsher times.

I’m glad you’re on the up and got the treatment you needed! Thankfully, with mental health issues being publicised and the stigma gradually being removed, people will find it easier to talk to a GP and get help.

As a side note: a big thank you to the anonymous donor to my Movember page! Every £ helps!
It's shame your relationship broke up ,but she obviously looked out for you by alerting your mum .
 

Ccfcisparks

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May 13, 2011
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It’s good to read stuff like this, in a weird way. I had a bout of anxiety at university in my final year. I generally lost interest in everything; rugby, football and did not care if I failed at university.

Eventually, it took for my then girlfriend to express her concerns to my mum. Who called me just outside a restaurant where my team was having a get together for team bonding as part of our varsity preparation. I was holding back tears. A week later, had to deal with a breakup just as I’d arranged to see a counsellor.

Anyway, things that helped me through my battle of beating my ‘wobble’. Stoic philosophy and teachings helped as a coping mechanism, and put some perspective on life. At this time, Tyson Fury’s Joe Rogan podcast appearance was inspiring, and equally harrowing (I seen him as a drunken mess weeks before he came out with his issues). Also, generally drinking less, procrastinating less and for me, getting out of academia and into the work place gave a lot more structure to my life and that helped a lot.

This is my third year of doing Movember properly, so I’m going to leave my fundraising link at the bottom here.

Perhaps in 2021, we could do an SBT fundraiser too!

Please donate, if you can:

So strange reading this. Almost exactly the same situation for me. Struggle with University couple with a rough breakup was my first real breakdown.
 
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Mucca Mad Boys

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So strange reading this. Almost exactly the same situation for me. Struggle with University couple with a rough breakup was my first real breakdown.
I’ve read some statistics that are worrying. My old university topped the country with 66% of people saying they suffer with mental health disorders.

My ex at Uni certainly struggled with a few more wobbles than I. As well as a few friends and acquaintances of mine. An acquaintance of my exes died of an overdose too.

It’s rampant on the university campus and, among other things, the universities need to expand their care to students.

It's shame your relationship broke up ,but she obviously looked out for you by alerting your mum .
Agreed. It’s a learning experience for sure. It certainly put me on a path to sort things out before things spiralled.
 

bulko

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Jun 9, 2013
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I’ve suffered since 2007 moved house bigger mortgage then bang lost shift allowance then bonus wages took a real hammering my depression started one morning woke up like I was in a pit looking up I hated everything wife job kids even the dog and that made it worse wanted to leave and started picking faults with the wife it was like I didn’t know her like she was distant. Went the doctors offered cbt or drugs or counselling didn’t do anything just put up with it spoke to a few blokes at work who had similar problems which made it a bit easier as I thought I was going mad. Things do get better over time I just wish I could be that person before it all started .
 

clint van damme

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May 3, 2015
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I am hearing about someone losing the canopy every day at the moment.

It's fucking frightening.
 

Evo1883

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May 25, 2013
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My experience is: try a few and find a therapist you get on with. I had success with a private CBT practitioner, won’t name him as I don’t think he’s still doing it sadly. But he was nothing like the flowery mumsy women you normally get that I didn’t get on with at all. Former alcoholic and Cov lad. Helped me massively once I found someone I respect.
Valley House?
 

Evo1883

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May 25, 2013
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A big problem people have with mental health problems is actually accepting they have them in the first place... Took me a couple years to finally accept I wasn't very well.
But the biggest problem is thinking you can cure it and make it go away forever, and becoming extremely agitated that it's not happening which can make you Spiral... For me, you can never truly get rid of mental health problems, only manage them... People need to accept that before they can make peace with themselves.. It's a horrible thing to have..

Accept it, embrace it, and get that thing under control... It's all you can do.