The EU: In, out, shake it all about....

As of right now, how are thinking of voting? In or out

  • Remain

    Votes: 23 37.1%
  • Leave

    Votes: 35 56.5%
  • Undecided

    Votes: 3 4.8%
  • Not registered or not intention to vote

    Votes: 1 1.6%

  • Total voters
    62
  • Poll closed .

Brighton Sky Blue

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2012
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Coventry
Basically Brexit has masterminded the exact environment required to trigger a border poll and break the Union up. The more chaotic Brexit is on Northern Ireland the more likely unification of Ireland is. A return to the troubles adds to that chaos.
Better wave that Union flag before it becomes anachronistic
 
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Brighton Sky Blue

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2012
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Coventry

skybluetony176

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2013
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Who would you vote for now if you were still over there?
Difficult one. I was brought up over here so am missing some of the ingrained loyalism that the majority of my family were raised with. One of my cousins was over visiting last year just before lockdown, he’s just retired from the PSNI and traditionally a DUP voter but voted Alliance in the GE. Not spoken to him since but he was pretty adamant that he was finished with the DUP. Most of my family live in Fermanagh and again mainly traditional DUP voters, Arlene Foster is their representative in the Assembly. As far as I can tell Aunts and Uncles will probably still vote DUP but younger generations won’t. Thing is as well you now have a couple of generations that are voting age and only know the peace process and enjoyed it, they also look at the dinosaurs of the DUP and see them holding them back on non Brexit subjects such as same sex marriage and pro choice for women, the DUP are also climate change deniers, crap at running the country and basically have nothing to offer them. Then you have the politics of the south where they have same sex marriage, pro choice for women and politicians that aren’t living in the dark ages. So it’s a choice of voting for a Party that wants to tie you into a Union that doesn’t want you at any cost, deny you basic rights such as same sex marriage and the right to have an abortion and think we’d be better off as part of a United Ireland and still in the EU like we voted for in the referendum.

So back to your original question I’d probably vote Alliance as my first preference vote (although I think I’d probably have done that anyway) and SDLP as my second preference vote. Don’t think I could bring myself to vote Sinn Fein but there seems an inevitability that they’ll be a border poll followed by a united Ireland so maybe voting Sinn Fein as first preference and SDLP as second will put an end to it quicker.

The polls in NI at the moment predict that Sinn Fein and the SDLP will control the assembly after the 2022 election so that’s pretty much a border poll guaranteed. The DUP have lost loads of ground in the polls and the UUP don’t seem to be picking up the votes, they mainly going to the neutral Alliance Party and to a lesser extent the SDLP.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2012
26,809
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Coventry
Difficult one. I was brought up over here so am missing some of the ingrained loyalism that the majority of my family were raised with. One of my cousins was over visiting last year just before lockdown, he’s just retired from the PSNI and traditionally a DUP voter but voted Alliance in the GE. Not spoken to him since but he was pretty adamant that he was finished with the DUP. Most of my family live in Fermanagh and again mainly traditional DUP voters, Arlene Foster is their representative in the Assembly. As far as I can tell Aunts and Uncles will probably still vote DUP but younger generations won’t. Thing is as well you now have a couple of generations that are voting age and only know the peace process and enjoyed it, they also look at the dinosaurs of the DUP and see them holding them back on non Brexit subjects such as same sex marriage and pro choice for women, the DUP are also climate change deniers, crap at running the country and basically have nothing to offer them. Then you have the politics of the south where they have same sex marriage, pro choice for women and politicians that aren’t living in the dark ages. So it’s a choice of voting for a Party that wants to tie you into a Union that doesn’t want you at any cost, deny you basic rights such as same sex marriage and the right to have an abortion and think we’d be better off as part of a United Ireland and still in the EU like we voted for in the referendum.

So back to your original question I’d probably vote Alliance as my first preference vote (although I think I’d probably have done that anyway) and SDLP as my second preference vote. Don’t think I could bring myself to vote Sinn Fein but there seems an inevitability that they’ll be a border poll followed by a united Ireland so maybe voting Sinn Fein as first preference and SDLP as second will put an end to it quicker.

The polls in NI at the moment predict that Sinn Fein and the SDLP will control the assembly after the 2022 election so that’s pretty much a border poll guaranteed. The DUP have lost loads of ground in the polls and the UUP don’t seem to be picking up the votes, they mainly going to the neutral Alliance Party and to a lesser extent the SDLP.
Pretty depressing stuff when combined with the shitshow in Scotland. I remember seeing some interesting polls on UI done in the Republic which showed support for it was heavily tied to economics above all else. Just a shame that the dinosaurs in the DUP can't evolve and are acting like frogs in boiling water
 

clint van damme

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2015
23,489
25,371
263
Difficult one. I was brought up over here so am missing some of the ingrained loyalism that the majority of my family were raised with. One of my cousins was over visiting last year just before lockdown, he’s just retired from the PSNI and traditionally a DUP voter but voted Alliance in the GE. Not spoken to him since but he was pretty adamant that he was finished with the DUP. Most of my family live in Fermanagh and again mainly traditional DUP voters, Arlene Foster is their representative in the Assembly. As far as I can tell Aunts and Uncles will probably still vote DUP but younger generations won’t. Thing is as well you now have a couple of generations that are voting age and only know the peace process and enjoyed it, they also look at the dinosaurs of the DUP and see them holding them back on non Brexit subjects such as same sex marriage and pro choice for women, the DUP are also climate change deniers, crap at running the country and basically have nothing to offer them. Then you have the politics of the south where they have same sex marriage, pro choice for women and politicians that aren’t living in the dark ages. So it’s a choice of voting for a Party that wants to tie you into a Union that doesn’t want you at any cost, deny you basic rights such as same sex marriage and the right to have an abortion and think we’d be better off as part of a United Ireland and still in the EU like we voted for in the referendum.

So back to your original question I’d probably vote Alliance as my first preference vote (although I think I’d probably have done that anyway) and SDLP as my second preference vote. Don’t think I could bring myself to vote Sinn Fein but there seems an inevitability that they’ll be a border poll followed by a united Ireland so maybe voting Sinn Fein as first preference and SDLP as second will put an end to it quicker.

The polls in NI at the moment predict that Sinn Fein and the SDLP will control the assembly after the 2022 election so that’s pretty much a border poll guaranteed. The DUP have lost loads of ground in the polls and the UUP don’t seem to be picking up the votes, they mainly going to the neutral Alliance Party and to a lesser extent the SDLP.
Best part of 400k Irish passports issued in the Britain since Brexit. Wonder if they can vote in a border poll?
 

jimmyhillsfanclub

Well-Known Member
May 31, 2012
4,675
5,213
263
here
Not sure it’s as cut and dried as that:
Indeed. I'm sure that brexit has ramped up the tension, but the PSNI have been all over the loyalist gangs since Xmas....clamping down on their organised rackets......and then theres the massive IRA funeral that went unpunished....and of course, a common underlying driver in Belfast & Derry that always makes the summer & marching season more colourful is high youth unemployment & deprivation......

They really missed a trick by not adding a sign to the side of the bus before torching it....fucking amateurs.
 

shmmeee

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2011
30,257
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Coventry, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
Indeed. I'm sure that brexit has ramped up the tension, but the PSNI have been all over the loyalist gangs since Xmas....clamping down on their organised rackets......and then theres the massive IRA funeral that went unpunished....and of course, a common underlying driver in Belfast & Derry that always makes the summer & marching season more colourful is high youth unemployment & deprivation......

They really missed a trick by not adding a sign to the side of the bus before torching it....fucking amateurs.
Yeah I listened to the Arlene Foster R4 interview and it was all about that IRA funeral. Now that might be the cover story cos she loves Brexit, but it also seems to fit and explains the timing better than Brexit did it.
 

PVA

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2011
4,886
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Don't forget there were threats against border staff a few months ago as well.

I'm sure there are other things at play too, but it would have to be VERY coincidental for this not to be related to Brexit.

Same as the huge decreases in exports are apparently nothing to do with Brexit and just a coincidence that they occur immediately after putting up huge trade barriers.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2012
26,809
9,923
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Coventry
Many are like abused girlfriend that think because their partner beats them it means they love them.
Well these are the folks who were willing to fight the British government if they weren’t allowed to remain part of the British state in 1922. I do wonder how it might be if Westminster simply gave a shit about genuinely improving life in NI. As one UUP politician said, ‘fix the roads, sort the hospitals and schools’.

I also find it funny that only in England do the Tories get credit for the vaccine procurement
 

Club25

Member
Apr 8, 2021
4
16
53
As a Dutchman living in the UK, I can only applaud the English for choosing self-determination over continued membership of the EU, even if 'Remain' would have arguably been more comfortable in the short term. As a foreigner I don't experience any kind of resentment towards 'us' continental folk either, and it really hasn't been a bother getting my affairs in order prior to Brexit and applying for pre-settled status afterwards.

If anything, I was surprised by how lax the requirements were for what is essentially a ticket to remain here forever (if I want, which I don't) despite having only moved in 2019. At least my children, when I have them, won't immediately receive the British nationality which I think is a sensible decision by the government.
 

Grendel

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2011
58,197
16,963
763
As a Dutchman living in the UK, I can only applaud the English for choosing self-determination over continued membership of the EU, even if 'Remain' would have arguably been more comfortable in the short term. As a foreigner I don't experience any kind of resentment towards 'us' continental folk either, and it really hasn't been a bother getting my affairs in order prior to Brexit and applying for pre-settled status afterwards.

If anything, I was surprised by how lax the requirements were for what is essentially a ticket to remain here forever (if I want, which I don't) despite having only moved in 2019. At least my children, when I have them, won't immediately receive the British nationality which I think is a sensible decision by the government.
You’ll get plenty of resentment for posting that on here
 

Sky Blue Pete

Well-Known Member
Nov 24, 2012
19,915
8,225
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As a Dutchman living in the UK, I can only applaud the English for choosing self-determination over continued membership of the EU, even if 'Remain' would have arguably been more comfortable in the short term. As a foreigner I don't experience any kind of resentment towards 'us' continental folk either, and it really hasn't been a bother getting my affairs in order prior to Brexit and applying for pre-settled status afterwards.

If anything, I was surprised by how lax the requirements were for what is essentially a ticket to remain here forever (if I want, which I don't) despite having only moved in 2019. At least my children, when I have them, won't immediately receive the British nationality which I think is a sensible decision by the government.
That’s interesting but not surprising. Short term of 40-50 years is gonna be quite a struggle though
 

PVA

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2011
4,886
3,284
113
As a Dutchman living in the UK, I can only applaud the English for choosing self-determination over continued membership of the EU, even if 'Remain' would have arguably been more comfortable in the short term. As a foreigner I don't experience any kind of resentment towards 'us' continental folk either, and it really hasn't been a bother getting my affairs in order prior to Brexit and applying for pre-settled status afterwards.

If anything, I was surprised by how lax the requirements were for what is essentially a ticket to remain here forever (if I want, which I don't) despite having only moved in 2019. At least my children, when I have them, won't immediately receive the British nationality which I think is a sensible decision by the government.
I wouldn't expect a Dutchman to experience any resentment in this country to be fair.
 

PVA

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2011
4,886
3,284
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So it's no longer Boris' brilliant oven ready deal, it's now the EU's deal/fault...

Embarrassing that the Tories get away with this shit and embarrassing that the media happily accommodate it.

 

PVA

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2011
4,886
3,284
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Its mad, incredibly frustrating that people seem to accept this. Same with the likes of Dan Hodges who is blaming the trouble on those who voted remain!
Yeah I just saw that too! It was inevitable that remainers would be blamed. Just blame anyone except themselves.

Of course this whole mess is the fault of the people who didn’t want it, never did, and still don’t. And definitely not the fault of those who voted it, or the government that agreed it, no siree.