Allotment/Veg patch

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
They are super-chitted.

They'll be fine - just follow the instructions in the previous post.
Are you sure about that, Mr Trench? These don't look like seed potatoes, just old spuds that haven't been stored properly. I would bin these and get proper seed potatoes. There is still time to get them chitted and planted. There is no telling whether or not they are diseased, and the sprouts will probably break off if an attempt is made to plant them.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Marty and mrtrench

mrtrench

Well-Known Member
Aug 17, 2008
4,522
3,262
163
Somewhere between the waitress and her table.
Are you sure about that, Mr Trench? These don't look like seed potatoes, just old spuds that haven't been stored properly. I would bin these and get proper seed potatoes. There is still time to get them chitted and planted. There is no telling whether or not they are diseased, and the sprouts will probably break off if an attempt is made to plant them.
You probably know loads more than me, I'm just self-teaching and making it up as I go along. I agree they look like normal spuds but I always plant them out when they chit (albeit in a different bag in case of disease) and it's always worked out ok.
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
You probably know loads more than me, I'm just self-teaching and making it up as I go along. I agree they look like normal spuds but I always plant them out when they chit (albeit in a different bag in case of disease) and it's always worked out ok.
I'm self-taught, too! When we moved into this house over 20 years ago, I walked up the garden to the veg patch with a gardening book in hand and a lot of hope inside me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mrtrench

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
Are you sure about that, Mr Trench? These don't look like seed potatoes, just old spuds that haven't been stored properly. I would bin these and get proper seed potatoes. There is still time to get them chitted and planted. There is no telling whether or not they are diseased, and the sprouts will probably break off if an attempt is made to plant them.
They were a few left overs from last year, I thought you could save any spuds and they'll grow again once planted. I stored them in cool, dark cupboard but obviously did something wrong.
 

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

Well-Known Member
Aug 16, 2018
9,291
5,831
213
They were a few left overs from last year, I thought you could save any spuds and they'll grow again once planted. I stored them in cool, dark cupboard but obviously did something wrong.
I think to keep the chits stubby they need a bit of light.
 

mrtrench

Well-Known Member
Aug 17, 2008
4,522
3,262
163
Somewhere between the waitress and her table.
They were a few left overs from last year, I thought you could save any spuds and they'll grow again once planted. I stored them in cool, dark cupboard but obviously did something wrong.
It's not ideal, Marty but I think it's as good a place to start as any. I started this way and still pop some in that have gone to chit from the bottom of the potato bag. The risk you have is disease, so keep them away from each other when you plant. If it works and you fancy doing more next year, think about buying some disease-free seed potatoes.

The important thing is to dig them into a trench as deep as you can and then gradually fill in the trench as they grow. The spuds grow on the green stalks you cover up later. I grow mine in bags or even old dustbins with holes through the bottom. Just because it's then very easy to dig them in deep and keep covering up during April/May/June. But as Dorset has already said - you must remember to keep watering them. Also would help if you can add organic matter.

On organic matter, you don't need to buy it. Here's some things you can do:

1. We have a polystyrene wormery which keeps stuff warm and doesn't release smells to attract rats. ALL waste food goes in there*. I put a seed tray beneath (one without holes) under the drip hole and every week you'll have a yucky brown liquid you can add to water to feed them. After a year you can dig in the finished worm matter from within. It goes dark brown.

2. Collect the green of nettles, or of you have it comfrey. Fill a bucket to the top and submerge it in water. After about 4 weeks it turns into a very smelly brown liquid. Dilute with water again for a great feed.

3. Compost garden waste in a heap. If you can, cut stalks etc. up small before adding. Grass cuttings are the easiest but you must add about 50% brown matter too (wood chippings; newspaper; torn card). It's composting when it gets hot (you can feel it and see steam rising). Turn it over to add more oxygen after 4-6 weeks. When it cools you have a great compost.

Good luck!


* EDIT: Just remembered, don't add citrus peel. Everything else though: potato peelings; pepper stalks; onion skin... everything. It will even take cooked food if you don't complete your meal. We are veggies and give ours to our hens, but it would take anything.
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
They were a few left overs from last year, I thought you could save any spuds and they'll grow again once planted. I stored them in cool, dark cupboard but obviously did something wrong.
Marty, are they leftover seed potatoes or leftover potatoes that were bought to eat? Fresh seed potatoes each year is the way to go. The ones in the picture look like they got a bit too warm and too little light.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
Marty, are they leftover seed potatoes or leftover potatoes that were bought to eat? Fresh seed potatoes each year is the way to go. The ones in the picture look like they got a bit too warm and too little light.
I planted seed potatoes last year I purchased from a garden store, then they grew a heap more spuds and these are some I didn't eat, so, wrapped them individually in kitchen roll then wrapped them into a tea towel and stuck them at the back of the cupboard in my kitchen. They haven't seen light since probably July/August.
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
I planted seed potatoes last year I purchased from a garden store, then they grew a heap more spuds and these are some I didn't eat, so, wrapped them individually in kitchen roll then wrapped them into a tea towel and stuck them at the back of the cupboard in my kitchen. They haven't seen light since probably July/August.
Personally, I'd bin them and get new seed potatoes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marty