Allotment/Veg patch

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
My sugar snap peas are described as the first purple variety, called Purple Magnolia. They are soooo sweet! Quite attractive in the plot too, as they have pink and purple flowers, so look a bit like sweet-peas. The other good thing about them is that they retain the purple colour when you cook them (as they only need about a minute). French beans go grey after a few minutes' boiling!
I'm trying to grow some unusual French beans for drying and use in casseroles, etc - borlotti are a red-and-white flecked bean, and yin-yang are black and white. But as i said before, they are struggling a bit.
I've got some purple kohl rabi on the go too.

I know you can grow apple trees in planters, so i'd have thought a cherry would work too, provided you get one with a dwarfing root stock. There is a new root stock called Gisela 5 which allows fruiting cherries to grow in tubs (about 6 feet tall).
Sounds awesome, You've got so much going on in your garden! I'm actually a little jealous. How big is your garden? Have to be honest, can't stand the taste of sugar snap peas one bit, I've only ever tried store bought so I can really justify using my limited space on something I'm not sure I'll even like at the end of it. I didn't even know grafting of trees was a thing until now, It's not something I would usually touch normally. I need to do some research.

It would be cool if you could post up some pics of your next harvest.
 
  • Like
Reactions: OffenhamSkyBlue

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
Latest dig. 10 spuds have grown nearly 8kg in total now. The big ones are going to be stored now for growing next year. Had a pick of my peas, carrots are coming on strong as well now. And finally managed to find enough soil to get my blueberries planted.

Not sure if someone can answer this, I think I've found the perfect spot for my tree, I've been reading up and it says it needs full sun for the best cherries yield, if I plant where I think the trunk will receive little to no light but the foliage will receive the sun at all times, would that be suitable location for it?
 

Attachments

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
Latest dig. 10 spuds have grown nearly 8kg in total now. The big ones are going to be stored now for growing next year. Had a pick of my peas, carrots are coming on strong as well now. And finally managed to find enough soil to get my blueberries planted.

Not sure if someone can answer this, I think I've found the perfect spot for my tree, I've been reading up and it says it needs full sun for the best cherries yield, if I plant where I think the trunk will receive little to no light but the foliage will receive the sun at all times, would that be suitable location for it?
Marty, the soil for your blueberries needs to be quite acid. All of mine are in containers (some quite large) filled with ericacious compost.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mrtrench and Marty

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
Marty, the soil for your blueberries needs to be quite acid. All of mine are in containers (some quite large) filled with ericacious compost.
Cheers dude, that's what took me the best part of a week to plant them, I couldn't find ericacious compost anywhere. Found it in Sainsbury's to my surprise. The PH needs to be around 4.5-5.5 for blueberries iirc.

They're in 30w x 27h (cm) pots, so that should be more then big enough for them.

I posted some pics of them on the previous page.
 
Last edited:

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

Well-Known Member
Aug 16, 2018
9,291
5,831
213
Latest dig. 10 spuds have grown nearly 8kg in total now. The big ones are going to be stored now for growing next year. Had a pick of my peas, carrots are coming on strong as well now. And finally managed to find enough soil to get my blueberries planted.

Not sure if someone can answer this, I think I've found the perfect spot for my tree, I've been reading up and it says it needs full sun for the best cherries yield, if I plant where I think the trunk will receive little to no light but the foliage will receive the sun at all times, would that be suitable location for it?
With the tree I'd have thought that's be absolutely fine. Probably better as it'll keep the moisture in the soil better. As long as the spots not too near the house with the roots etc.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marty

skyblueusername

Well-Known Member
Jul 8, 2016
305
357
263
I took home my first trug full from the allotment today, petite pois and carrots that are both doing really well.
None of the first early potatoes are ready yet, they should have been ready at the beginning of June but that frost in late May and then a good few weeks of no rain has put them back a few weeks, same with the runner beans. The frost also killed off most sweetcorn, only 6 out of 20 survived and may now be spaced too far apart to pollinate each other.
Cabbages, broccoli and cauliflowers are not doing well either and are full of bugs and caterpillars.
Tomatoes and peppers are all doing really well so far, got lots outside as well as in the greenhouse.
The weeds are doing really, really well, they have thoroughly enjoyed this weather.
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
Cheers dude, that's what took me the best part of a week to plant them, I couldn't find ericacious compost anywhere. Found it in Sainsbury's to my surprise. The PH needs to be around 4.5-5.5 for blueberries iirc.

They're in 30w x 27h (cm) pots, so that should be more then big enough for them.

I posted some pics of them on the previous page.
Marty, those pots seem a bit small. Normally, when you buy a blueberry plant, you need to put it in a pot the next size up from the one it is sold in. Then they will need repotting every couple of years, going up a size. My biggest blueberries are in tubs about 2.5 feet across and 3 feet deep. Depending on variety, blueberries can grow several feet tall.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
Marty, those pots seem a bit small. Normally, when you buy a blueberry plant, you need to put it in a pot the next size up from the one it is sold in. Then they will need repotting every couple of years, going up a size. My biggest blueberries are in tubs about 2.5 feet across and 3 feet deep. Depending on variety, blueberries can grow several feet tall.
Great info, I went for the Collins variety, I have gone up a size and will repot after a couple of years, from what I've read, blueberries need a gradual increase in pot size but I didn't realise they needed pots as large as what you have, I think I maybe better building a raised bed for it. How much do your bushes produce? Would love to see a pic of them. Thanks for the help, really appreciate it.
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
Great info, I went for the Collins variety, I have gone up a size and will repot after a couple of years, from what I've read, blueberries need a gradual increase in pot size but I didn't realise they needed pots as large as what you have, I think I maybe better building a raised bed for it. How much do your bushes produce? Would love to see a pic of them. Thanks for the help, really appreciate it.
The size of the pots depends on the size of the plant, Marty. We've several varieties, but none of them are doing very well this year - the late Spring frosts around here damaged a lot of the blossom, so yields will be well down on previous years. We have them in a fruit cage to keep the birds off them (and the other soft fruit we grow). You'll have to think of a way to protect them from birds. They are well worth growing (take a look at the price of a punnet of blueberries in the supermarkets). Just remember to keep them well watered (with rainwater if poosible, unless you live in a soft water area).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marty

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
The size of the pots depends on the size of the plant, Marty. We've several varieties, but none of them are doing very well this year - the late Spring frosts around here damaged a lot of the blossom, so yields will be well down on previous years. We have them in a fruit cage to keep the birds off them (and the other soft fruit we grow). You'll have to think of a way to protect them from birds. They are well worth growing (take a look at the price of a punnet of blueberries in the supermarkets). Just remember to keep them well watered (with rainwater if poosible, unless you live in a soft water area).
I thought you based the pot on the size of the root ball and the plant will adjust accordingly? I was going to purchase some horticultural fleece and wrap it around, the price of blueberries is the main reason I decided to have my own, I go through 2 punnets a week, I have them with my porridge daily so they should pay for themselves after a good season.
 

shmmeee

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2011
30,303
21,494
313
Coventry, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
My dad grows blueberries (or did haven’t been down the garden this year), pots are huge I remember lugging them down there. Probably 40-50cm across? Bushes maybe 1m around? Guessing from memory here.

When I get my own place I want to grow. Mostly for the taste (tomatoes especially) but with blueberries for the cost.
 

SBAndy

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
2,419
2,034
213
Also been keen to get into growing my own veg. How deep would raised beds need to be in order to be suitable for your more common veg?
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
I thought you based the pot on the size of the root ball and the plant will adjust accordingly? I was going to purchase some horticultural fleece and wrap it around, the price of blueberries is the main reason I decided to have my own, I go through 2 punnets a week, I have them with my porridge daily so they should pay for themselves after a good season.
The size of the root ball is, of course important because if the plant gets rootbound it will be unhappy. Your variety 'Collins' will grow to about 4' - 6' tall and could be the same across.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marty

Marty

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
5,670
1,623
163
The size of the root ball is, of course important because if the plant gets rootbound it will be unhappy. Your variety 'Collins' will grow to about 4' - 6' tall and could be the same across.
Thanks for your help, I'm gonna build a raised bed for it over the coming weeks. Think it would be best.
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
Marty, if I can drive this SBT system correctly, I have posted a picture of one of my blueberries 'Herbert'. For scale, the roof of the fruit cage is 7' from the ground.D4B36783-26D5-4F83-B911-EE558A7292F3.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marty and mrtrench

mrtrench

Well-Known Member
Aug 17, 2008
4,522
3,262
163
Somewhere between the waitress and her table.
Also been keen to get into growing my own veg. How deep would raised beds need to be in order to be suitable for your more common veg?
Mine are about 12 inches, which is fine for everything apart from root veg. I grow all root veg in bags or old plastic bins. Spuds go in bags and are thriving this year. Carrots and parsnips in bins. I started doing this because I heard that the carrot fly cannot go higher than a few inches. But also carrots need quite sandy soil so I mix that up for the bin only. Great tip earlier about chitting parsnip seeds. I got only one germinate from my first sow and had to sow more a few weeks ago - they're coming along now.

Beans and squash (including courgettes) need lots of nutrients - we save all food waste in a polystyrene bin and dig it into the ground for the hungry veg in spring.

If you're just starting I recommend Gardeners' World. It's a good watch anyway and I love Monty Don, but over the years you pick up more and more - I'm still learning from it. Had zero knowledge when I started.

I've often grown garlic from sprouting shop-bought stock. Works just fine. Not sure about the leaks idea*. I'm doing my first leaks this year and they are still the size of spring onions.

* EDIT: I think that your leak will bolt - meaning it goes to seed immediately and won't be edible. Let us know.
 

mrtrench

Well-Known Member
Aug 17, 2008
4,522
3,262
163
Somewhere between the waitress and her table.
Here's my spuds in bags and parsnips and carrots in pots. The tall flower is one of last year's parsnips I accidentally left in - so I'm letting it grow for the seed.

Also a photo of my as yet anaemic swede.

IMG_20200625_100752_resized_20200625_100930491.jpg IMG_20200625_100803_resized_20200625_100929395.jpg IMG_20200625_100837_resized_20200625_100928212.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Marty

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
Any tips on swede guys? Doing my first this year and whilst they are coming along the edible bit is not very bulbous yet. Do I need to water more often?
I wish I knew, Mr. Trench. Every time I have tried to grow swede, they have ended up like carrots growing above ground.:emoji_confused:
 
  • Like
Reactions: mrtrench

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
Also been keen to get into growing my own veg. How deep would raised beds need to be in order to be suitable for your more common veg?
I think that 12' - 18' will be fine as long as you are not trying to grow carrots or parsnips for exhibition.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mrtrench

jimmyhillsfanclub

Well-Known Member
May 31, 2012
4,683
5,231
263
here
Very impressed by the effort, knowledge & produce here folks....

I've got 5 little raised beds on the go....1 each for the kids & 3 for me.
Got various berries going on fairly well, enough to top the breakfast cereals fresh every morning at present.

Kids have got a good batch of carrots, purple peas & french beans going on.

My garlic looks bumper this year but some of my salads & rocket have bolted, and I've gotta move the goal as my kids "top bins" target is too close to my runner beans.

i'm still a beginner & Carol Kleins book is my bible.

RHS Grow Your Own: Veg By Carol Klein | Used | 9781845332938 | World of Books
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
3,729
1,597
163
North Dorset
I've had lots of tomatoes the last few weeks but no peppers yet, the romano peppers have just started ripening but this storm has blew out about 6 panes of glass out the greenhouse, it also flattened all my sweetcorn!
That's a real pain in the arse!
 

mrtrench

Well-Known Member
Aug 17, 2008
4,522
3,262
163
Somewhere between the waitress and her table.
Too many courgettes to mention: using them up and giving them away but still have a huge pile. Also have a huge crop of chilli (which will freeze). The aubergines are starting to get big enough to pick - just taken the first with many more on the way.

This butternut squash is 70cm long and that cucumber is the thickest one I've ever seen.

IMG_20200830_112342_resized_20200830_112405894.jpg
 

shmmeee

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2011
30,303
21,494
313
Coventry, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
Too many courgettes to mention: using them up and giving them away but still have a huge pile. Also have a huge crop of chilli (which will freeze). The aubergines are starting to get big enough to pick - just taken the first with many more on the way.

This butternut squash is 70cm long and that cucumber is the thickest one I've ever seen.

View attachment 16686
Those are monsters! Good work!
 
  • Like
Reactions: mrtrench