Do you want to discuss boring politics?

wingy

Well-Known Member
Jul 9, 2011
26,266
5,224
213
Started to think they orchestrated this to slip this through without anyone noticing
Probably worked and backfired at the same time. I don’t think they expected the response they got from local businesses and individuals.
Or 14 to 7 day's isolation.
 

shmmeee

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2011
27,372
18,032
263
Coventry, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
Rumours swirling around of a pending u-turn on kids meals. Seems Conservative MPs who voted against it are now unhappy they are being held to account by their constituents.

Hancock claims Johnson and Rashford are talking, Rashford knows nothing about it.

Also this morning calls for Johnson and Patel to apologise for attacks on lawyers. This is the problem with the Conservatives trying to claim they have been getting abuse following Raynors comments, people might then turn round and highlight your own actions.
Random question: Can Rashford now have “Rashford MBE” on the back of his shirt? Is he the first non retired footballer to be given an honour?
 

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

Well-Known Member
Aug 16, 2018
8,061
4,927
113
These PPE contracts are scandalous.
I understand buying in excess given we were caught with our pants down at the start having ignored Cygnet, but to have bought nearly 60 times the amount we've supposedly used is excessive, and certainly totally unnecessary under 'emergency contracts' which avoid scrutiny. They could be bought using usual procurement methods.

There is a part of me that things the sums somewhere must be wrong and we've used more than that, but the fact that I also think it's well within the realms of possibility for this government to do something so corrupt to ensure mates and donors get more public funds during a time of crisis in which tens of thousands are dying it shows just how little faith I have not just in their competence but also in their ethics.

There are times when I wish I was religious so I could at least believe these bastards would eventually get their comeuppance.
 

wingy

Well-Known Member
Jul 9, 2011
26,266
5,224
213
I understand buying in excess given we were caught with our pants down at the start having ignored Cygnet, but to have bought nearly 60 times the amount we've supposedly used is excessive, and certainly totally unnecessary under 'emergency contracts' which avoid scrutiny. They could be bought using usual procurement methods.

There is a part of me that things the sums somewhere must be wrong and we've used more than that, but the fact that I also think it's well within the realms of possibility for this government to do something so corrupt to ensure mates and donors get more public funds during a time of crisis in which tens of thousands are dying it shows just how little faith I have not just in their competence but also in their ethics.

There are times when I wish I was religious so I could at least believe these bastards would eventually get their comeuppance.
Might include items they might prefer to not publicise , associated with death?
 

chiefdave

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2008
26,570
14,800
363
Coventry
This sentence leapt out at me. "The Court of Appeal imposed a block on new arms sales to the autocracy in June 2019, but the government lifted it following a review in July 2020.". That seems to basically say the court said they couldn't do it but the government did it anyway.
 

skybluetony176

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2013
26,003
10,769
263
This sentence leapt out at me. "The Court of Appeal imposed a block on new arms sales to the autocracy in June 2019, but the government lifted it following a review in July 2020.". That seems to basically say the court said they couldn't do it but the government did it anyway.
I’m sure governments find themselves in court from time to time but over the last 5 years it’s been a full time occupation for the Tories. They’re facing a JR over how they’ve been issuing Covid contracts, to who, why and where’s the information that they’re supposed to issue on this within a certain timeframe but aren’t.
 

Grendel

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2011
55,333
14,593
763
This sentence leapt out at me. "The Court of Appeal imposed a block on new arms sales to the autocracy in June 2019, but the government lifted it following a review in July 2020.". That seems to basically say the court said they couldn't do it but the government did it anyway.
It’s a crackpot group that has a principal aim of stopping arms sales to Israel and is pro Palestine

you really need to get back to the office and have a day off
 

fernandopartridge

Well-Known Member
Dec 9, 2011
21,965
16,440
263
It’s a crackpot group that has a principal aim of stopping arms sales to Israel and is pro Palestine

you really need to get back to the office and have a day off
It's quite OK for governments to decide to ignore the independent judiciary at will.
 

fernandopartridge

Well-Known Member
Dec 9, 2011
21,965
16,440
263
Total grift. Any lockdown will be well gone before the next set of elections. Just a way to extract cash from the same credulous idiots he fleeced with BXP.
Whilst at the same time distracting them from what an at best damp squib Brexit really is.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shmmeee

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

Well-Known Member
Aug 16, 2018
8,061
4,927
113
What a bellend Farage is.
That has to be a parody right? Even Farage will know that that'll be seen for what it is - another excuse to extract money from people. Not like lockdown is a long term thing that requires a party against it.

I mean, if you want to call your party reform there's just so many long term things to choose from to want to reform, certainly in terms of governance. But that's not going to get the stupid reactionaries to throw money at him so instead pick on the hot topic of the day even though anyone with half a brain could tell you you don't need a party against lockdown.

Also shows up his constant gripe that he didn't want to be in politics and was just involved because he wanted out of the EU as horseshit. He wants part of that gravy train he supposedly hates more than anyone.

If true this is showing him up as the charlatan he always was.
 

chiefdave

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2008
26,570
14,800
363
Coventry
Its pretty damning really that despite the country being run into the ground by a bunch of incompetent, negligent spivs, lickspittles & carpet-baggers, thats the best he can do...... +2 for the nowhere man.
Part of the problem here is you've had a loud group of Labour centrists spending the last couple of years telling everyone Labour would be 15 points ahead if anyone but Corbyn was in charge.

Doesn't then look good when they get their man in and, with probably the worst performing government in decades, are struggling to establish a clear lead in the polls.
 

David O'Day

Well-Known Member
Feb 28, 2015
7,355
2,815
163
Its pretty damning really that despite the country being run into the ground by a bunch of incompetent, negligent spivs, lickspittles & carpet-baggers, thats the best he can do...... +2 for the nowhere man.
He started about 20 points behind FFS
 

David O'Day

Well-Known Member
Feb 28, 2015
7,355
2,815
163
Part of the problem here is you've had a loud group of Labour centrists spending the last couple of years telling everyone Labour would be 15 points ahead if anyone but Corbyn was in charge.

Doesn't then look good when they get their man in and, with probably the worst performing government in decades, are struggling to establish a clear lead in the polls.
He started about 20 points behind, FFS some people talk some shit
 

Ian1779

Well-Known Member
Dec 6, 2012
6,364
3,830
163
He started about 20 points behind FFS
Didn’t Corbyn start 25 points behind May? And he was shit apparently. Still not seeing any evidence of how Starmer plans to win back the North, hold on to the youth vote or offer any kind of meaningful direction on Green issues, austerity. He’s backed out of pretty much all his leadership election pledges.

He appears to only be interested in appealing to centrist ‘focus groups’ and people that read the Daily Mail. It might be a demographic Labour need to win - but not at the expense of losing other demographics.
 
  • Like
Reactions: clint van damme

Mucca Mad Boys

Well-Known Member
Jul 26, 2012
8,091
2,520
213
Coventry
Part of the problem here is you've had a loud group of Labour centrists spending the last couple of years telling everyone Labour would be 15 points ahead if anyone but Corbyn was in charge.

Doesn't then look good when they get their man in and, with probably the worst performing government in decades, are struggling to establish a clear lead in the polls.
Given that we’re not even 1 year into a 5 year parliament, it wouldn’t really matter if Labour were + 10 or 15% in the polls.

Miliband had a couple of good polls results in the lead up to 2015, and Labour lost a lot of seats.

A bit pessimistic here, but I really struggle to see how Labour forms a majority. They need the Lib Dems to have a comeback, about 10-20 Scottish seats from nowhere and win back its seats in the ‘red wall’ and so on. They need to build a new electoral coalition and I’m not really sure how it does that.
 

wingy

Well-Known Member
Jul 9, 2011
26,266
5,224
213
Given that we’re not even 1 year into a 5 year parliament, it wouldn’t really matter if Labour were + 10 or 15% in the polls.

Miliband had a couple of good polls results in the lead up to 2015, and Labour lost a lot of seats.

A bit pessimistic here, but I really struggle to see how Labour forms a majority. They need the Lib Dems to have a comeback, about 10-20 Scottish seats from nowhere and win back its seats in the ‘red wall’ and so on. They need to build a new electoral coalition and I’m not really sure how it does that.
Would his brother returning to Britain and politics in this country be a benefit or hindrance do you think , personally I think he's wasted out of it?
Same goes for Rory Stewart.
Both possess genuine wisdom.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sky_Blue_Dreamer

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

Well-Known Member
Aug 16, 2018
8,061
4,927
113
Would his brother returning to Britain and politics in this country be a benefit or hindrance do you think , personally I think he's wasted out of it?
Same goes for Rory Stewart.
Both possess genuine wisdom.
I like both of them too. But as we've seen before once you get into the big seat and you've got advisors telling you this, that and the other it just ends up being the usual shithouse with others immediately looking to stab you in the back so they can have a crack.

Although very different philosphies I think Milliband and Stewart could actually create a decent compromise together if they wanted to and critically were allowed to.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wingy

Ian1779

Well-Known Member
Dec 6, 2012
6,364
3,830
163
Given that we’re not even 1 year into a 5 year parliament, it wouldn’t really matter if Labour were + 10 or 15% in the polls.

Miliband had a couple of good polls results in the lead up to 2015, and Labour lost a lot of seats.

A bit pessimistic here, but I really struggle to see how Labour forms a majority. They need the Lib Dems to have a comeback, about 10-20 Scottish seats from nowhere and win back its seats in the ‘red wall’ and so on. They need to build a new electoral coalition and I’m not really sure how it does that.
Starmer offers nothing at the moment that will entice the red wall back. He hasn’t even apologised to them for losing them in the first place with his nonsense Brexit agenda.
 

Ian1779

Well-Known Member
Dec 6, 2012
6,364
3,830
163
Would his brother returning to Britain and politics in this country be a benefit or hindrance do you think , personally I think he's wasted out of it?
Same goes for Rory Stewart.
Both possess genuine wisdom.
I genuinely can’t see what the attraction to D Milliband is. He’s a glorified consultant, and being honest I see more in Stewart.