The EU: In, out, shake it all about....

As of right now, how are thinking of voting? In or out

  • Remain

    Votes: 23 37.1%
  • Leave

    Votes: 35 56.5%
  • Undecided

    Votes: 3 4.8%
  • Not registered or not intention to vote

    Votes: 1 1.6%

  • Total voters
    62
  • Poll closed .

clint van damme

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2015
19,930
21,345
263
I see we’re backing down over access to fishing waters. Where the hell is BMW when you need them.
Good job it only makes up a knats ball hair of our GDP.
Maybe the penny's dropping that it's not worth trashing manufacturing for. What the hell am I on about, penny dropping? Of course it's not!
 

skybluetony176

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2013
25,811
10,631
263
Gove also said border checks were inevitable when we leave. Don't recall him saying that when he was campaigning.
That was project here err... I mean fear. The cost to the chemical industry on the other hand is a new one I think. Maybe project fear was actually project optimism.
 

chiefdave

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2008
26,257
14,525
363
Coventry
At this point I'm assuming the only reason we're insisting on going ahead and leaving in December in the middle of a pandemic is so the government can shift the blame for as much of the negative impact of leave as possible onto covid.
 

skybluetony176

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2013
25,811
10,631
263
At this point I'm assuming the only reason we're insisting on going ahead and leaving in December in the middle of a pandemic is so the government can shift the blame for as much of the negative impact of leave as possible onto covid.
Doesn’t wash though. It’s a global pandemic so everyone is on an even playing field therefore it changes nothing. If Brexit is going to be a shit load of bollocks during a global pandemic it was always going to be a shit load of bollocks. If Brexit is going to be what was promised it would clearly be a benefit just when it’s needed most.
 

chiefdave

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2008
26,257
14,525
363
Coventry
Doesn’t wash though. It’s a global pandemic so everyone is on an even playing field therefore it changes nothing. If Brexit is going to be a shit load of bollocks during a global pandemic it was always going to be a shit load of bollocks. If Brexit is going to be what was promised it would clearly be a benefit just when it’s needed most.
Don't disagree at all but that requires people to actually look past what they're being told by the likes of Johnson, Gove, Farage etc and we know that doesn't happen. They'll stand up and say Brexit would have been a fantastic success but for covid and anyone who points out the obvious flaw in the statement will be labelled a remoaner.
 

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

Well-Known Member
Aug 16, 2018
7,576
4,638
113
#takingbackcontrol
So something else we've been saying would happen from the start but dismissed as Project Fear has happened...

But hey, we don't want to be told what to do by other nations.

If they had any balls whatsover they say if they want the trade they put in the standards we have. if not we can have other partners that are willing to meet them. People like, I don't know, the EU maybe...
 

AVWskyblue

Well-Known Member
Sep 30, 2016
263
154
43
Wheres Astute? Haven't seen him on here for ages, hope he and his family are ok

Sent from my Alba7Nou using Tapatalk
 
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Grendel

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2011
54,664
14,223
763

SkyBlueCharlie9

Well-Known Member
Feb 16, 2018
263
225
93
Found it .
It's time for Britain to return to heptarchy.

The Heptarchy, according to Bartholomew’s A literary & historical atlas of Europe (1914)
Geography is destiny, and there are some good geographical reasons why England became the dominant world power and not France.

England is 50,000 square miles, roughly the size of New York state, while France is four times that, as big as Texas. When England was united by King Athelstan in 927, he created a state ideally suited towards governing by a medieval monarch.

Aside from the need to have powerful barons on the northern and western frontier, itself a source of conflict throughout the later middle ages, it was about the right size to create the infrastructure to collect tax and administer justice, and all the other necessities for governing a successful nation-state. It was also about the right size for a fairly coherent national culture; English regional differences are minute compared to, say, Italy.

France, as anyone who has driven across the place with kids will appreciate, is massive. It was way too big, and too culturally diverse, to create the necessary infrastructure, which is why even in the days of the crusades the King of England could easily raise more tax than his French counterpart. And so England has never needed political devolution, except for the brief Council of the North, even though it has distinctive regional identities.

And so, when in the late 20th century demands for Scottish and Welsh devolution became overwhelming, the Government proposed solving the West Lothian Question by offering regional self-government in England too. The people of the North East were offered the chance — and turned it down, the No campaign run by one Dominic Cummings.

But perhaps it might be time to revisit the idea. Covid-19 has shown serious fundamental weaknesses in the British system of government; this may be just the bubble I live in but many people are dismayed at how badly the country works. The cabinet may be lightweight, and contain people not up to the job, but the institutional rot seems to go deeper.

I don’t know why, but compare how Germany’s federal system has coped with the shock so much better, and you have to wonder if regional governments here would have done a more effective job, too. Transport in some regions is clearly badly served by London, and I imagine in other areas like healthcare or planning regional governments would do better than the capital, which seems to attract so many mediocre people.

There is also still the problem of asymmetric devolution, which as it stands will surely lead to Scottish independence, because the current system sets everything up as a conflict between Westminster and Edinburgh. Were the English regions to have their own government then that would no longer be so much the case, and the Scottish FM would occasionally have to work alongside her counterparts in opposition to London, such as the First Minister of Northumbria.

And yes, of course we should also lose the dull, joyless names we currently give our regions and put Wessex, Mercia and Northumbria back on the map again.

Hopefully we’ll get this done in time for the 1100th anniversary of the Kingdom of England, as commemorated by me and about four other cranks. It looks like we’re well on the way to the ancient kingdom of Kent being restored to greatness, with the new Kent Access Permit. Hengist and Horsa must be smiling
Living in Kent s nowt special mate, very mediocre and uninspiring place - could have been great but run and protected by conservative rural bumpkins.
 
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Seamus1

Well-Known Member
Aug 5, 2010
418
350
63
Hope everyone is looking forward to their chlorinated chicken
Not to mention maggots in orange juice.

Farmers did vote for this though (53%), and the ERG’s own expert Patrick Minford, who JR-M lauds, did state that leaving the EU would result in the end of farming and manufacturing in this country.

Farming down, manufacturing to go...
 
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skybluetony176

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2013
25,811
10,631
263
Not to mention maggots in orange juice.

Farmers did vote for this though (53%), and the ERG’s own expert Patrick Minford, who JR-M lauds, did state that leaving the EU would result in the end of farming and manufacturing in this country.

Farming down, manufacturing to go...
Could never work out the farmers mentality on this. This was always an inevitable consequence of Brexit. Also the farmers asking the day after what about our EU grants and what about our EU seasonal workforce. Don’t vote to leave the EU then. Chlorinated Turkey’s voting for Xmas.