Kevin Thomson

fatso

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Jun 19, 2017
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That's ironic given your contribution to this thread.
But fair play, you've managed to outdo your initial post with the one you just put up about enduring hardship. Quite an achievement that.
I really don’t know if your just having a laugh, or if you actually are incapable of grasping the simplest of ideas.
 

mr_monkey

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Aug 4, 2013
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It’s just a valid example of how the public used to be able to cope with severe hardship. And is used as just one example.
I do realise that some on here won’t be able to grasp that though.
And how much ptsd was/still is there around because of it? You have no idea what is going on with people, especially the poor people who lived through that as the way was to put on the brave face
 
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steve cooper

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Dec 6, 2017
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This thread is getting ot of hand (again)
I was young in an era when a school teacher would throw a board rubber around the classroom if he (very few she's) felt like it. A piece of equipment consisting of a hardwood handle weighing about 1kg. I have had my hand split with a cane more than once, and I was one of the better behaved pupils.
Things have changed, and massively for the better, which is obviously good, but that's how things were years ago.
 

clint van damme

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May 3, 2015
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I really don’t know if your just having a laugh, or if you actually are incapable of grasping the simplest of ideas.
The youngsters today are enduring something much more difficult than anything our generation went through in the form of these lock downs and I reckon they're doing alright.

I know we're going through it as well but in my opinion it's a lot easier to endure for us and we're not missing out on anywhere near as much as them.

So why you've used a thread about a bullying incident to start having a go at them is just weird in my opinion, I'll say no more on the subject.
 

PurpleBin

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Feb 27, 2017
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Liverpool
Anyone remember when that footballer from Nuneaton put a banana up a young lads bottom in some sort of training ground hijinks?
 

Hobo

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May 13, 2013
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The problem with this is it is dinosaur coaching methods (bullying/banter often the same thing) which has no place in the modern work place.

The problem with dinosaur coaching (bullying/banter) is it does create an environment where child abuse can take place. There are enough examples in football to back it up. It needs stamping out and shouldnt be tolerated. Coaches should be professional enough not to get involved in social media spats.
 
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Brighton Sky Blue

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Jan 11, 2012
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This thread is getting ot of hand (again)
I was young in an era when a school teacher would throw a board rubber around the classroom if he (very few she's) felt like it. A piece of equipment consisting of a hardwood handle weighing about 1kg. I have had my hand split with a cane more than once, and I was one of the better behaved pupils.
Things have changed, and massively for the better, which is obviously good, but that's how things were years ago.
Corporal punishment wasn't legal in the mid 90s
 

Sick Boy

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Sep 29, 2008
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Boot polish on the balls?
Why the fuck would anyone want to do that to someone? Fucking weirdos.
 

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

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Aug 16, 2018
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It’s just a valid example of how the public used to be able to cope with severe hardship. And is used as just one example.
I do realise that some on here won’t be able to grasp that though.
They coped with it in the sense of they kept breathing in and out and their hearts kept beating. And you do realise suicide was a criminal act until the 60's and would leave your family with nothing if you took that way out. They stayed alive, not coped.

Do you know how many soldiers that came back from the front line of the World Wars that never talked about it even to their dying day? How many at the mere mention of it would get tears in their eyes at the thoughts of what they'd experienced? How many suffered from shellshock and were shot as cowards and traitors for having the temerity to lose their minds under constant bombardment that they couldn't even function? How many returning from later wars like Vietnam and Falklands have PTSD? How many people cracked in history under torture either because their brains just couldn't cope or admitting to something they hadn't done and being put to death would be a blessed relief for them?

Even civilians aren't immune. If you read the accounts of officials about the aftermath of the Coventry Blitz the consensus was far from blitz spirit. The morale and demeanour of the city folk was considered so low that it concluded if the Luftwaffe had come back one more night the spirit of the people would've broken entirely and the war effort here would've ceased to be functional for months.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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They coped with it in the sense of they kept breathing in and out and their hearts kept beating. And you do realise suicide was a criminal act until the 60's and would leave your family with nothing if you took that way out. They stayed alive, not coped.

Do you know how many soldiers that came back from the front line of the World Wars that never talked about it even to their dying day? How many at the mere mention of it would get tears in their eyes at the thoughts of what they'd experienced? How many suffered from shellshock and were shot as cowards and traitors for having the temerity to lose their minds under constant bombardment that they couldn't even function? How many returning from later wars like Vietnam and Falklands have PTSD? How many people cracked in history under torture either because their brains just couldn't cope or admitting to something they hadn't done and being put to death would be a blessed relief for them?

Even civilians aren't immune. If you read the accounts of officials about the aftermath of the Coventry Blitz the consensus was far from blitz spirit. The morale and demeanour of the city folk was considered so low that it concluded if the Luftwaffe had come back one more night the spirit of the people would've broken entirely and the war effort here would've ceased to be functional for months.
In WW1 the Silver War Badge was awarded to wounded soldiers discharged from service not because of the inherent goodwill of the government but because the soldiers kept being harassed by the public for being cowards not wanting to fight.
 

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

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Aug 16, 2018
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In WW1 the Silver War Badge was awarded to wounded soldiers discharged from service not because of the inherent goodwill of the government but because the soldiers kept being harassed by the public for being cowards not wanting to fight.
It does seem a lot of those that talked about the war (and those that glorified in it) were those that never actually served at the front. Hence the constant referral to Blitz spirit. now don't get me wrong having that kind of fear and bombing is going to be fucking horrifying but in comparison to serving on the frontlines it's a pale comparison.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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It does seem a lot of those that talked about the war (and those that glorified in it) were those that never actually served at the front. Hence the constant referral to Blitz spirit. now don't get me wrong having that kind of fear and bombing is going to be fucking horrifying but in comparison to serving on the frontlines it's a pale comparison.
To be fair my grandad was in the merchant navy in WW2 but admitted that he spent his time ‘chasing skirt around Portsmouth docks’ and ‘fucking about at the controls’ when he was on duty.
 

fernandopartridge

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Dec 9, 2011
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It does seem a lot of those that talked about the war (and those that glorified in it) were those that never actually served at the front. Hence the constant referral to Blitz spirit. now don't get me wrong having that kind of fear and bombing is going to be fucking horrifying but in comparison to serving on the frontlines it's a pale comparison.
Love the blitz spirit apart from when it comes to giving up any freedom at all, like they did for years in WW2.
 

kg82

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Jul 28, 2008
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Corporal punishment wasn't legal in the mid 90s
That’s true, although I had one teacher in primary school that didn’t really care about that. Many times that hard block of wood went flying past my head. It got a few people. He’d also slam the lift top on your desk down on your fingers if you had it open. We were 8-9 years old and literally everyone was too scared to say anything to anyone else. The classroom was positioned so it wasn’t near any others too, so he was getting away with it.
Karma got him in the end, in a big way.
 

Alkhen

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Jul 23, 2012
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It’s just a valid example of how the public used to be able to cope with severe hardship. And is used as just one example.
I do realise that some on here won’t be able to grasp that though.
That generation litterally had no choice, you don't know how anyone would cope in till they are in the situation. Anyway my grandad was fucked after WW2 never the same again by all accounts. He 'coped' because he had no choice but it damaged him for life mentally.

The younger generation have a new set of tests. They can't buy their council house for 20k or retire at 60, they are automatically lumbered with debt if they try to better themselves in further education. Basically life is difficult enough no one needs any unwanted attention, bullying whatever you want to call it.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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That’s true, although I had one teacher in primary school that didn’t really care about that. Many times that hard block of wood went flying past my head. It got a few people. He’d also slam the lift top on your desk down on your fingers if you had it open. We were 8-9 years old and literally everyone was too scared to say anything to anyone else. The classroom was positioned so it wasn’t near any others too, so he was getting away with it.
Karma got him in the end, in a big way.
Thankfully the worst I had in primary school was being forced into doing arty stuff all the time because the teacher assumed all children like it.
 
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Sick Boy

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That’s true, although I had one teacher in primary school that didn’t really care about that. Many times that hard block of wood went flying past my head. It got a few people. He’d also slam the lift top on your desk down on your fingers if you had it open. We were 8-9 years old and literally everyone was too scared to say anything to anyone else. The classroom was positioned so it wasn’t near any others too, so he was getting away with it.
Karma got him in the end, in a big way.
Yeah we got the board rubbers in the 90s too - I think that we used to get threatened with the cane and told there was one in the school still.
 

cov donkey kick

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Jul 25, 2020
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Not condoning it. At that time a lot of shit went on back then, and that wasn't only in football and it would not likely to happen now in a lot of circumstances, back then you were raised just to get on with it as it was survival of the fittest.
 

stevefloyd

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Jan 16, 2013
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Tell me how having a finger stuck up your arse stops you from crying over being told you’re crap?
My arsehole is my inner sanctum and I wouldn't like anyones finger stuck up it for character building or otherwise !!
 
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