Help with 'offers in excesss' when buying a house

Macca1987

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2016
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Afternoon all, reaching out for some advice on the above.
We have been looking at purchasing a house, initially it was up at a set price, vendors are buying a new build, but before we got to viewing the details had changed to offer in excess of the price.
Now the wife really want's this house and we put an offer in £5k over the asking price, we have now been told that there are 13 viewings and the vendor wants to go through them all to see if there are any other offers.
Does this type of thing turn into a bidding war, or what should we expect next.
Any advice would be most appreciated
 

skyblueindorset

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2011
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Afternoon all, reaching out for some advice on the above.
We have been looking at purchasing a house, initially it was up at a set price, vendors are buying a new build, but before we got to viewing the details had changed to offer in excess of the price.
Now the wife really want's this house and we put an offer in £5k over the asking price, we have now been told that there are 13 viewings and the vendor wants to go through them all to see if there are any other offers.
Does this type of thing turn into a bidding war, or what should we expect next.
Any advice would be most appreciated
It could easily turn into a bidding war, as can any house purchase. If your wife really wants that house, set yourselves an unbreakable limit on your offer.
 

chiefdave

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2008
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Coventry
Afternoon all, reaching out for some advice on the above.
We have been looking at purchasing a house, initially it was up at a set price, vendors are buying a new build, but before we got to viewing the details had changed to offer in excess of the price.
Now the wife really want's this house and we put an offer in £5k over the asking price, we have now been told that there are 13 viewings and the vendor wants to go through them all to see if there are any other offers.
Does this type of thing turn into a bidding war, or what should we expect next.
Any advice would be most appreciated
If you've already offered 5K over and they're messing about I'd be tempted to walk away as much as you might want it. Unless you think they've undervalued it and it is genuinely worth more.
 

SBAndy

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2011
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If you've already offered 5K over and they're messing about I'd be tempted to walk away as much as you might want it. Unless you think they've undervalued it and it is genuinely worth more.
OIEO is just a sales ruse, in my opinion at least. If it does become a bidding war you’ve just got to know your limit.
 
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Brylowes

Well-Known Member
Jan 7, 2016
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Afternoon all, reaching out for some advice on the above.
We have been looking at purchasing a house, initially it was up at a set price, vendors are buying a new build, but before we got to viewing the details had changed to offer in excess of the price.
Now the wife really want's this house and we put an offer in £5k over the asking price, we have now been told that there are 13 viewings and the vendor wants to go through them all to see if there are any other offers.
Does this type of thing turn into a bidding war, or what should we expect next.
Any advice would be most appreciated
The price the house eventually sells for will always equate to its actual market value.
often houses aren’t quite as straightforward to value, sometimes because they maybe quirky or situated in an unusual location, or the current owner has spent more on improvements that you would normally expect in such a house.
If you really want it and think the house is the one for you and its within budget, forget the original asking price, work out what the house is worth to you and make an offer on the condition they remove it from the market.
We bought a house a couple of years back that was advertised as ‘offers in excess of’ we viewed it and loved it, offered £15000 above the asking price, we made it clear that we loved the house but that would be our final offer and we would move on if the house wasn’t immediately withdrawn from sale.
They accepted and we couldn’t be happier.
£5000 probably just isn’t quite enough to stop them gambling for a bit more. It’s stick or twist isn’t it, you just need to find their sticking point.
Good Luck.
 
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fernandopartridge

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Dec 9, 2011
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OIEO is just a sales ruse, in my opinion at least. If it does become a bidding war you’ve just got to know your limit.
It really is. It's just another way of saying no offers. I'd offer them a £1 over that price to begin with, unnecessary to pre empt a bidding war
 

shmmeee

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2011
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Don’t get attached. More houses will come along, look at the market and what premium you’re willing to put on certain things you want like location/whatever. Then bid up to what you think the house is worth.

Personally I’d never have gone straight in at £5k over, I’d have bid at or below the asking price to test the water, worst they can say is no and you up the bid. Place I’m buying was OIEO and I bid £10k below, only to be negotiated up to £5k below.
 
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Marty

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Mar 20, 2011
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I offered 6k below OIEO and still got it, they kinda got pissed off when I tried low balling them about a week before exchanging.
 

Macca1987

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2016
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Cheers chaps
All good thoughts and ideas
Will see how it goes this week with any other offers
Been told they won’t do anything until Friday giving all others viewings a chance to put an offer in
It’s an assisted sale managed by a third party company trying to keep the builder and vendor happy
 

Great_Expectations

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Mar 18, 2011
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As others have said, if you’ve offered 5k over right off the bat and they haven’t accepted, coupled with the 13 viewings, they are obviously expecting it to sell for a lot more. Which begs the question why put it on at a lower price in the first place!

Equally those viewings won’t all equate to offers, and potentially not offers more than yours either.

Have your maximum bid set and stick to it - don’t get caught in the drama/emotion of it all, which isn’t always easy.

And as Shmmeee said, you’ll ‘fall in love’ with other houses if this doesn’t work. I know from personal experience - my partner fell in love with about 20 over the last 12 months (and we weren’t even actively looking!) and on reflection even she agrees they weren’t right, as well as a few that fell through/didn’t work that we both really liked, but we eventually found the right one.
 

Rich

Moderator
Mar 1, 2009
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If you've already offered 5K over and they're messing about I'd be tempted to walk away as much as you might want it. Unless you think they've undervalued it and it is genuinely worth more.
If they have valued it correctly, your mortgage company will soon let you know if you’re offering more than it’s worth.
 

Macca1987

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2016
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If they have valued it correctly, your mortgage company will soon let you know if you’re offering more than it’s worth.
Mortgage isn’t a problem as being oldies we have a big deposit so only really looking at about 55% to 60% mortgage
Thanks to all with their thoughts
I think I’m intending to follow the good advice and set a ceiling
This is our second real try, we fell in love with another nearby had our offer accepted then two months in they pulled the house from the market
 
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RedSalmon

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Mar 25, 2011
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What is it about this house that your wife really likes? Had a similar situation years ago with my wife, and when we broke it down the aspects she liked were applicable to lots of other houses and therefore opened up our options. Also, set your maximum and be prepared to walk away if it goes over that or the seller starts to mess you around.
Good luck.
 

Sbarcher

Well-Known Member
Mar 23, 2011
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Oxford
It really is. It's just another way of saying no offers. I'd offer them a £1 over that price to begin with, unnecessary to pre empt a bidding war
£5,000,001 comes to mind!
 

Grendel

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Sep 19, 2011
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It’s a marketing gimmick to try and establish the house has a minimum value - it doesn’t really mean anything
 
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