Follow On from Membership Thread / Kids Today!

Brighton Sky Blue

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2012
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I wasn't aiming it at you, I was talking in general when people want the world but then kick off they can't afford it with no comprimise.
I suppose if that attitude exists it's because of the increased competition. London is that taken to the most ridiculous extent where you're paying megabucks to stay in someone's back garden shed
 

chiefdave

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Sep 27, 2008
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So if somebody was brought up on the Kenilworth Road but then got a job in McDonalds on 11K a year. Should they just be given a 500k house for cheap?
Totally get where you're coming from and there's no doubt there's a group of people who happily piss their money away and then complain but don't think that's the case for everyone. In my mind if you're working full time you should be able to afford a half decent standard of living.

For me the issue is, and I can only speak personally, how my situation compares to my parents.

My Dad did the same job from leaving school, with little in the way of qualifications, to retirement. It was strictly 9-5. Off the back of that he always had a newish car, couple of holidays a year and a nice detached house that's now worth the best part of £500K. His pension every month is more than my salary.

Now I'm not saying everything was brilliant for him and there wasn't times when it was tough but by contrast I spent four years at Uni studying Computer Science, and came out with a nice debt, and work in what he would consider a 'better' job.
I'm lucky if my work week is less than 60 hours - with no overtime or TOIL plus evening and weekend calls are the norm.
I drive a heap of shit 12 year old car that's done 130K miles, as having a car is a requirement of my job. My last holiday was a long weekend camping in Devon in 2013, in my adult life I've been on 9 holidays, and one of those was my wedding and 3 of them were long weekends rather than a week on a beach.
Buying a 2 bed terrace has pushed my finances to the absolute limit. Even pre-covid I couldn't even tell you the last time I went to a pub or restaurant or had a takeaway. If by some miracle the stress doesn't kill me before I reach the ever increasing retirement age I'll be lucky to be able to afford to retire judging by my pension statements.

Don't get me wrong, I'm well aware that there are many people in a far worse position than me but not everyone is living the life racking up huge credit card bills.
 

Grendel

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Sep 19, 2011
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Totally get where you're coming from and there's no doubt there's a group of people who happily piss their money away and then complain but don't think that's the case for everyone. In my mind if you're working full time you should be able to afford a half decent standard of living.

For me the issue is, and I can only speak personally, how my situation compares to my parents.

My Dad did the same job from leaving school, with little in the way of qualifications, to retirement. It was strictly 9-5. Off the back of that he always had a newish car, couple of holidays a year and a nice detached house that's now worth the best part of £500K. His pension every month is more than my salary.

Now I'm not saying everything was brilliant for him and there wasn't times when it was tough but by contrast I spent four years at Uni studying Computer Science, and came out with a nice debt, and work in what he would consider a 'better' job.
I'm lucky if my work week is less than 60 hours - with no overtime or TOIL plus evening and weekend calls are the norm.
I drive a heap of shit 12 year old car that's done 130K miles, as having a car is a requirement of my job. My last holiday was a long weekend camping in Devon in 2013, in my adult life I've been on 9 holidays, and one of those was my wedding and 3 of them were long weekends rather than a week on a beach.
Buying a 2 bed terrace has pushed my finances to the absolute limit. Even pre-covid I couldn't even tell you the last time I went to a pub or restaurant or had a takeaway. If by some miracle the stress doesn't kill me before I reach the ever increasing retirement age I'll be lucky to be able to afford to retire judging by my pension statements.

Don't get me wrong, I'm well aware that there are many people in a far worse position than me but not everyone is living the life racking up huge credit card bills.
This isn’t just about age though is it.

The Coventrian / Valiant I know lives in a half a million house has an Audi and a new Ford has zero qualifications goes frequently to a local hostelry for meals and drinks and I’d guess is the same age as you
 

Liquid Gold

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2013
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So if somebody was brought up on the Kenilworth Road but then got a job in McDonalds on 11K a year. Should they just be given a 500k house for cheap?

The solution is surely either get mummy and daddy to buy you a big house in the Docklands or buy elsewhere and upgrade as your career progresses?

There's no point saying "I want to live here" and how it's not fair.

Move to a shit area, do the house up a bit, make money on it and upgrade after a bit.
It’s a bit different on a fancy road compared to whole cities and counties becoming unaffordable.
 

Nick

Administrator
Feb 25, 2008
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It’s a bit different on a fancy road compared to whole cities and counties becoming unaffordable.
As was the Docklands example.

Just move to a shitter part where the prices are less?

I'd love to demand I live in Finham or Syvechale but I can't afford to so I don't.
 

letsallsingtogether

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Jun 30, 2012
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the average house price is £220 that’s average across everything - it’s not £250 but will readjust back again

The place where I bought my first house is selling at £147 at the moment
I have just sold a two up two down for 160k and have r3placed it with a 2 bed flat for 140k.
There is a nice 2 bed flat in Whitley going for 100k.
Got my first house for 27k average at that time was about 35k. Mortgage rates at the time went up to 15% quite crippling for a lot of people.
 

Mild-Mannered Janitor

Kindest Bloke on CCFC / Maker of CCFC Dreams
Feb 3, 2015
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Cannot compare the different era’s effectively, finance has been cheap for so long now then it gives the confidence for finance companies to offer more, for a longer period and at a greater multiple, there is also more players offering this so more competitive. To compare when I purchased my first at 14% isn’t easy as completely different and rates could move by a whole 1% and unemployment was at over 3m with no job security, if I were buying now in this market when I did back then, then I would leverage and borrow every penny I could because employment is good and you can refinance regularly at zero or nil cost.
 
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shmmeee

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Jul 11, 2011
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This isn’t just about age though is it.

The Coventrian / Valiant I know lives in a half a million house has an Audi and a new Ford has zero qualifications goes frequently to a local hostelry for meals and drinks and I’d guess is the same age as you
The plural of anecdote isn’t fact. Just because you can find someone doing well (and I know lots of people that made bank during the housing bubble that skew the averages) doesn’t mean on average it’s not a generational issue.

You can pull out all the exceptions you like all the data is very very clear that this is the first generation who’s standard of living won’t rise like the ones before it.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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Jan 11, 2012
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I have just sold a two up two down for 160k and have r3placed it with a 2 bed flat for 140k.
There is a nice 2 bed flat in Whitley going for 100k.
Got my first house for 27k average at that time was about 35k. Mortgage rates at the time went up to 15% quite crippling for a lot of people.
The price you paid for your first house was the same as the deposit we had to pay for ours
 

Grendel

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Sep 19, 2011
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Hahahha

can’t believe people are still going on about interest rates.

Don’t make me tap the house price chart again. 14% is fuck all when your asset rises in value 400%
Come back to me on that when your paying 3 times the payment you are now - and if that did occur house prices would crash
 

Sky Blue Pete

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Nov 24, 2012
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The price you paid for your first house was the same as the deposit we had to pay for ours
First house in trentham road in 91 was £19000, next was £58500 in martyrs close cheylesmore in 2000, then the chesils in styvechale in 2002 for £122500.

Prices now £120k in hill fields, £200k in martyrs close and probably £340 in the Chesils. It’s madness
 

Covkid1968#

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Apr 1, 2013
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South Leics...unfortunately
Thought I’d just check on the Membership thread........ think I’ll come back later.😳😳😳
 
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letsallsingtogether

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The price you paid for your first house was the same as the deposit we had to pay for ours
I know my daughter is trying to buy a house in Manchester the prices are higher then Coventry for a half decent area.

When I got my first house I worked At the Jag Daimler as a setter Operator on £147 a week good money in those days, good job my wife worked as I got made redundant 3 years after buying the house. With high interest rates and a new baby is was a struggle.

Time moves on but the struggles are the same.
 
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Brighton Sky Blue

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I know my daughter is trying to buy a house in Manchester the prices are higher then Coventry for a half decent area.

When I got my first house I worked At the Jag Daimler as a setter Operator on £147 a week good money in those days, good job my wife worked as I got made redundant 3 years after buying the house. With high interest rates and a new baby is was a struggle.

Time moves on but the struggles are the same.
I wasn’t having a dig the number just stood out for that reason. Interest might be lower but just affording the deposit is too big an obstacle for many
 

Houchens Head

Fairly well known member from Malvern
Jan 24, 2011
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Being an old git (68 today - yeah, yeah alright, happy birthday etc!) I live on a state pension, along with Mrs HH. Pooled together it totals about £1200 a month. Out of that we pay £500 rent, plus all other bills such as electric, gas, phones, internet, council tax and food. Not a lot left each month.
 
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Brighton Sky Blue

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2012
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Being an old git (68 today - yeah, yeah alright, happy birthday etc!) I live on a state pension, along with Mrs HH. Pooled together it totals about £1200 a month. Out of that we pay £500 rent, plus all other bills such as electric, gas, phones, internet, council tax and food. Not a lot left each month.
Surely you qualify for some kind of shagger's bonus?
 

Mild-Mannered Janitor

Kindest Bloke on CCFC / Maker of CCFC Dreams
Feb 3, 2015
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Hahahha

can’t believe people are still going on about interest rates.

Don’t make me tap the house price chart again. 14% is fuck all when your asset rises in value 400%
I don’t think anyone expected that to happen, it was a very nervous time to buy at that time but I also agree that the generation now are worse off relatively and interest rate increases would destroy them. They may end up in a better situation from money potentially passed down to them from the final salary pension generation and the real hardship will be the generation after as this generation will have had to use that money but that’s a big generalisation and there will be so many individual circumstances that these comparisons and comments cannot cover.
 

wingy

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Jul 9, 2011
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Being an old git (68 today - yeah, yeah alright, happy birthday etc!) I live on a state pension, along with Mrs HH. Pooled together it totals about £1200 a month. Out of that we pay £500 rent, plus all other bills such as electric, gas, phones, internet, council tax and food. Not a lot left each month.
Happy belated birthday then you slightly older git .😉
 
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