Fitness trainer controversy

Nick

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Feb 25, 2008
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Anybody seen in the press everybody getting their knickers in a twist because a woman said she wouldn't hire an overweight person for a job?

Obviously there would be exceptions in terms of actual illness but just being overweight? I can see where she is coming from.

I've put timber on and it does affect random things, especially after lockdown.
 

Evo1883

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May 25, 2013
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I think we need to be honest and say that being overweight is not healthy, not something to celebrate and causes strain on health services...

So if I was hiring somebody for a job in fitness, they wouldn't be fat

PS... I'm 18 stone so I'm hardly dwayne Johnson
 

Nick

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Feb 25, 2008
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I think we need to be honest and say that being overweight is not healthy, not something to celebrate and causes strain on health services...

So if I was hiring somebody for a job in fitness, they wouldn't be fat

PS... I'm 18 stone so I'm hardly dwayne Johnson
Yeah I'm on the tubby side too. I don't have a massively physical job but even just moving boxes or equipment I can tell the difference as opposed to when I was boxing, football and the gym all the time.
 

Evo1883

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Yeah I'm on the tubby side too. I don't have a massively physical job but even just moving boxes or equipment I can tell the difference as opposed to when I was boxing, football and the gym all the time.
Could barely see my dick standing up last year... Certainly didn't celebrate that
 

Marty

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Mar 20, 2011
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Fat acceptance costs lives... That's the biggest shame of it all
Yep! It's dangerous to normalize such an unhealthy lifestyle, people who go along with the 'acceptance', are idiots who's opinion hold no value in my eyes.
 

Mild-Mannered Janitor

Kindest Bloke on CCFC / Maker of CCFC Dreams
Feb 3, 2015
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I think we need to be honest and say that being overweight is not healthy, not something to celebrate and causes strain on health services...

So if I was hiring somebody for a job in fitness, they wouldn't be fat

PS... I'm 18 stone so I'm hardly dwayne Johnson
I think Dwayne Johnson is over 18 stone, he’s just 2 foot taller than us and all muscle
 
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shmmeee

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Funny one isn’t it? There’s a whole load of grey between fat acceptance and fat shaming, and stats show that diets and other weight loss techniques have very little long term impact. Then you’ve got a clear problem with increased food availability and cost to the NHS that makes it a government issue as well.

Id say for a job in fitness fair enough, as long as you can prove it has a detrimental impact on their performance. I’d be pissed off if my boss told me to lose weight though. Though they did say they’d never have hired me if they knew I smoked.
 

Nick

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Smoking is another thing but again depends on the person.

We had a lad start with us, he used to take about 5 or 6 fag breaks a day and then would fuck off for an hour for his lunch. He was smoking for a good hour as well.

Not everybody who smokes will take the piss but if somebody is a non smoker it doesn't match up.

It's also not the same for everybody so I can only give my view, when I feel healthier, fitter and a bit more trim I am much better mentally and that does transfer into work. If I am sat there eating crisps all day with my gut resting on the table then I am more of a miserable c**t.
 

dubed

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Aug 14, 2012
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Smoking is another thing but again depends on the person.

We had a lad start with us, he used to take about 5 or 6 fag breaks a day and then would fuck off for an hour for his lunch. He was smoking for a good hour as well.

Not everybody who smokes will take the piss but if somebody is a non smoker it doesn't match up.

It's also not the same for everybody so I can only give my view, when I feel healthier, fitter and a bit more trim I am much better mentally and that does transfer into work. If I am sat there eating crisps all day with my gut resting on the table then I am more of a miserable c**t.
Totally agree about the mental aspect of it. Over the past two or three years, I have been putting on weight. I know that it is my fault in the wrong choice of coping mechanism. Over that period I've had a couple of reasonably extended diet attempts, and have been struck by the rise in my energy levels and mental well-being. I think in the majority of cases, the root cause and vicious circle in fatness is unhappiness, despite what (we) fatties say.
 
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Marty

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Funny one isn’t it? There’s a whole load of grey between fat acceptance and fat shaming, and stats show that diets and other weight loss techniques have very little long term impact. Then you’ve got a clear problem with increased food availability and cost to the NHS that makes it a government issue as well.

Id say for a job in fitness fair enough, as long as you can prove it has a detrimental impact on their performance. I’d be pissed off if my boss told me to lose weight though. Though they did say they’d never have hired me if they knew I smoked.
In regards to diets working long term, what are we actually looking at, people not sticking to a diet? I stuck to my healthy eating for a solid 3 years and kept on looking better and better, when I got injured and started drinking again and allowing myself bad food where I knew I wasn't doing the work to burn it off, the weight started to come back, that's not the diets fault, that's all on me. From what I see from people I regularly interact with, people want near instant results and it just doesn't happen like that. It takes years to put on weight and it's the same when it comes off.
 

shmmeee

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In regards to diets working long term, what are we actually looking at, people not sticking to a diet? I stuck to my healthy eating for a solid 3 years and kept on looking better and better, when I got injured and started drinking again and allowing myself bad food where I knew I wasn't doing the work to burn it off, the weight started to come back, that's not the diets fault, that's all on me. From what I see from people I regularly interact with, people want near instant results and it just doesn't happen like that. It takes years to put on weight and it's the same when it comes off.
We’re looking at longitudinal studies. One I saw had something like a 90% recidivism rate. Can’t find it but this states rare to keep it off for more than a year:Relapse in obesity treatment: biology or behavior?

Bit old now though.

I mean you’re probably right that “given a decent dose of mental health and resilience and willpower it’s possible”. But you could say that about almost anything. It’s just kicking the can down the road to mental health, something we’re even worse at fixing.
 

Travs

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I think if you're looking at a trainer for sports, then it's preferable to have someone's who has "been there and done it"... obviously there are exceptions... Arsene Wenger and Arrigo Sacchi the popular examples in football...

I'm pretty much against a lot of the whole PT culture... you appear to basically join up to a course to be a PT, sometimes the course is affiliated and ran by a chain of gyms, effectively meaning you're paying a fee for potential employment there.

I suppose what pisses me off is seeing a facebook friend who's name is "***** ******* PT" and she has absolutely no fitness experience outside having done the compulsory course. I'm not saying I, or anyone else in a similar position, should get special treatment, but i was fortunate enough to compete professionally in one sport, and earn a county vest in another, yet i'd not even be allowed to press the start button on a treadmill for a "client" because i'd be deemed unqualified... i understand there has to be some qualifications but surely there's some middle ground.

I guess this is most frustrating for the genuine-article personal trainers... they get lumped in with the idiots that come out of the chain gym system.

I knew a guy in a previous job. He was paying a PT (who i also knew) to schedule his training and diet... the PT was allowing him to eat McDonalds which doesn't really seem like good advice to be paying for. Mind you the PT quit our football team in a huff because the manager wouldn't give him a wake-up alarm call on a sunday morning, so he was a bit of a helmet anyway...
 

Marty

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We’re looking at longitudinal studies. One I saw had something like a 90% recidivism rate. Can’t find it but this states rare to keep it off for more than a year:Relapse in obesity treatment: biology or behavior?

Bit old now though.

I mean you’re probably right that “given a decent dose of mental health and resilience and willpower it’s possible”. But you could say that about almost anything. It’s just kicking the can down the road to mental health, something we’re even worse at fixing.
I think it's something like only 3% have kept the weight off once they hit the 5 year mark, valid point re: mental health, I do think people are overweight due to unhappiness and potentially using it as a coping mechanism.
 

shmmeee

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I think it's something like only 3% have kept the weight off once they hit the 5 year mark, valid point re: mental health, I do think people are overweight due to unhappiness and potentially using it as a coping mechanism.
Oh definitely. I comfort eat for sure. Like smoking weed, I’m sure if I was mentally healthy I wouldn’t need it. But that’s a big ask on its own.

Overall do agree of fat positivity though. People need to know it’s unhealthy and mentally you’re treated so differently whenyou’re fat that it’s just better all round to lose it. Just not sure where the line between motivation and shame sits.
 

skyblue1991

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Dec 19, 2012
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I think if you're looking at a trainer for sports, then it's preferable to have someone's who has "been there and done it"... obviously there are exceptions... Arsene Wenger and Arrigo Sacchi the popular examples in football...

I'm pretty much against a lot of the whole PT culture... you appear to basically join up to a course to be a PT, sometimes the course is affiliated and ran by a chain of gyms, effectively meaning you're paying a fee for potential employment there.

I suppose what pisses me off is seeing a facebook friend who's name is "***** ******* PT" and she has absolutely no fitness experience outside having done the compulsory course. I'm not saying I, or anyone else in a similar position, should get special treatment, but i was fortunate enough to compete professionally in one sport, and earn a county vest in another, yet i'd not even be allowed to press the start button on a treadmill for a "client" because i'd be deemed unqualified... i understand there has to be some qualifications but surely there's some middle ground.

I guess this is most frustrating for the genuine-article personal trainers... they get lumped in with the idiots that come out of the chain gym system.

I knew a guy in a previous job. He was paying a PT (who i also knew) to schedule his training and diet... the PT was allowing him to eat McDonalds which doesn't really seem like good advice to be paying for. Mind you the PT quit our football team in a huff because the manager wouldn't give him a wake-up alarm call on a sunday morning, so he was a bit of a helmet anyway...
Have you read James Smith 'Not a Diet Book'? He talks about the fitness industry and how much of a mess it is. All driven by social media (Instagram)
 

Travs

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Jul 13, 2013
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Have you read James Smith 'Not a Diet Book'? He talks about the fitness industry and how much of a mess it is. All driven by social media (Instagram)
I've not, but thanks for the recommendation, I'll try and check it out...
 

Flying Fokker

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Mar 24, 2011
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The best examples of fitness trainers who’ve walked the walk and kept the weight off.
 

bringbackrattles

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Aug 19, 2013
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I had a chap working with me on the window cleaning round who worked out in the gym, and had worked on the doors as a bouncer. He asked in the pub for a start as he was in between jobs and needing some work. Anyway he lasted about an hour ! Too bulky to go up the ladder, disliked the cold, and basically really slow. Told him this job ain't for you mate and he agreed and went away. Off thread a bit, but the ones who you think look the part often aren't, and then you get a skinny or " fat" person who is as fit as a fiddle !