After The Lockdown ?

bringbackrattles

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Aug 19, 2013
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So we are slowly returning to " normal " after the lockdown. How are you finding things ? I'm back window cleaning and customers are pleased that their windows are now nice and sparkly again. I noticed a few though are now working from home, mini offices set up in their homes. I've asked them are you enjoying your new work routine ? And all agreed it was better and hoped they wouldn't go back to their old way of working. As for the pub I haven't been in any yet, will wait till it settles down a bit. But life feels strange and different, yet this is the new " normal " I guess for years to come ?
 

Liquid Gold

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Sep 16, 2013
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Brizzle
Been to a few pubs which seem fine, generally just no contact, sit at table and have drinks bought over, 1 in 1 out of the loo.

I like that everywhere has hand sanitiser, I hope that stays a thing. I'm trying to get used to wearing a mask but constantly forgetting them, I have about 10 of them knocking about.

I'm really liking my current work situation, I can work from home and go into the office as I please, started at 9:30 this morning, did a couple of hours then decided I wanted to change scene so now in the office.

The only thing that really annoys me is that if I feel slightly ill in any way, even just a hangover, I'm convinced that I've got the rona and that's it.
 

shmmeee

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WFH thing is weird. We had a chat at work the other day about how we want to move forward, and despite really wanting to WFH before all this now I'm missing the office and my productivity is taking a hit I've said I want a hybrid flexible model.

Talking to my HR consultant sister and it seems a lot of businesses don't want to go back to the old ways now they've proven WFH can work, downsizing office space, etc. Knock on impacts to the economy will be interesting: office providers going bust? sandwich shop/coffee vans losing custom? All those related industries like water coolers, office supplies, etc. Not sure what the upside will be economically, I'm spending a lot less, buying food from supermarkets and generally not going out spending in the day now. Maybe in the housing market with people wanting more space/more rural? Not sure increased house prices is a positive though. Definitely good for IT and online services.
 
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Liquid Gold

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Brizzle
We were looking at expanding our office space before all this and now were looking at smaller spaces that are mainly a couple of meeting rooms then easy hot desk/benching workstations.

I think it's going to be weird starting a new job and not knowing anybody though and when you're training and learning how the organisation does things not being able to just ask questions.

It's weirdly started some unofficial flexi time arrangement, my phone is always there so if people need me I can do stuff. Some days I've been quiet and ended up watching tv or playing video games by 3 other days I've been working till 9.
 
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clint van damme

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started tentatively looking for a house somewhere quieter than I am now.
I've got a nice little garden ,never used to bother with it, in it all the time now.
Have not missed going out anywhere near as much as I thought.
Losing job in 6 weeks, don't really give a fuck.
Was supposed to be going travelling in 6 months, that's been putting on the back burned , not really arsed.
Lock down has totally changed my attitude to things.
It's a bit weird to be honest.
 

Liquid Gold

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Brizzle
I'm supposed to be emigrating to Australia with my partner's work being moved over there but I'm hella anxious about leaving a good stable job with the global economic clusterfuck to come.
 

shmmeee

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We were looking at expanding our office space before all this and now were looking at smaller spaces that are mainly a couple of meeting rooms then easy hot desk/benching workstations.

I think it's going to be weird starting a new job and not knowing anybody though and when you're training and learning how the organisation does things not being able to just ask questions.

It's weirdly started some unofficial flexi time arrangement, my phone is always there so if people need me I can do stuff. Some days I've been quiet and ended up watching tv or playing video games by 3 other days I've been working till 9.
We’ve had five new starters since lockdown at my place. I’ve met three of them at a socially distanced lunch that was organised, otherwise they’re just faces on Teams, it is a bit weird.
 

Liquid Gold

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Brizzle
We’ve had five new starters since lockdown at my place. I’ve met three of them at a socially distanced lunch that was organised, otherwise they’re just faces on Teams, it is a bit weird.
Work lunches are a bit odd with people you know anyway. You get to know people when you're chatting nonsense to them 8 hours a day and then go to the pub.
 
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chiefdave

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I'm supposed to be emigrating to Australia with my partner's work being moved over there but I'm hella anxious about leaving a good stable job with the global economic clusterfuck to come.
Obviously things are a bit different now with the current crisis but know a couple of people who have moved out there for work and they don't regret it in the slightest. Say they have a lower workload, better better and better of standard of living than here.

One of them tried to get me to move out there, had a job lined up at his place, but the now ex-wife didn't want to go. Should have gone anyway.
 
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Liquid Gold

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Brizzle
Obviously things are a bit different now with the current crisis but know a couple of people who have moved out there for work and they don't regret it in the slightest. Say they have a lower workload, better better and better of standard of living than here.

One of them tried to get me to move out there, had a job lined up at his place, but the now ex-wife didn't want to go. Should have gone anyway.
I'm thinking of letting the other half go, getting a visa sorted then only moving when I have a job sorted. Spent years getting into the industry I''m in now and I don't want to end up temping for peanuts in a great recession.
 

Alan Dugdales Moustache

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I think for some, working from home would be difficult long term . You get motivation just from working with others and having a break during workday in your own home isn't really a break.
Working from home is a bit lonely and you need motivation you may get more readily in an office environment.
 

AOM

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Jul 8, 2016
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I think for some, working from home would be difficult long term . You get motivation just from working with others and having a break during workday in your own home isn't really a break.
Working from home is a bit lonely and you need motivation you may get more readily in an office environment.
Agree with this tbh.
Find I work a lot longer hours from home in the week, but I'm less productive overall as well.
Getting a lot more sleep than if I was getting up to go over to the office though, and it's nice being able to exercise in the mornings or on lunch breaks!
 

OffenhamSkyBlue

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May 7, 2015
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I've been very fortunate during lockdown in that i have been kept amazingly busy (due to my line of specialism) while doing the WFH thing (and have felt more valued as a result than i have for a long time), but also that the missus has been WFH and busy too. It's a testament to how well we get on together, i think.
Anyway, i have discussed future arrangements with my line manager, and she is happy with my suggestion of WFH 3 days a week on a permanent basis, gathering meetings and other on-site stuff into the two days when i'm there.
Missus will be working pretty much full-time from home, with perhaps one day a week in the office to have contact with her direct reports. She now has a complete ethernetted office set-up (including proper desk, chair, monitor, docking station, etc) paid for by work.

We recognise how fortunate we are, and i see that when i read how tough some of you have had it. Chins up, guys!

PS Saving a fortune on commuting costs and have an extra 2 hours a day as my own, or to allow flexing of my hours.
 

clint van damme

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I think for some, working from home would be difficult long term . You get motivation just from working with others and having a break during workday in your own home isn't really a break.
Working from home is a bit lonely and you need motivation you may get more readily in an office environment.
Would love a job WFH. Never really done it and I can imagine there are potential pitfalls as you've hilighted but I'd love to have a crack at it.
The 3 day home 2 in the office model sounds ideal.
 

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

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Work lunches are a bit odd with people you know anyway. You get to know people when you're chatting nonsense to them 8 hours a day and then go to the pub.
Might result in more 'team days' etc to gain/maintain that sense of team. So invest in Go Ape/paintball.
 

wingy

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Jul 9, 2011
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Is there a contrast appearing here,
like with the advent of the internet?
Should we just accept things have changed and get on with it,or recognise that social physical presence and interaction is vital or imperative to performance or mental health .
Secondly if it is detrimental to mental health/ performance or discipline , doesn't it require more adaption?
Economically tertiary business must adapt ,maybe a switch to a nightime from daytime emphasis would help.
 

Sky_Blue_Dreamer

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I think we are seeing a bit of a long term change.

I reckon as we get used to wearing masks in shops etc it will become a common thing as it is in Asia.

WFH will be more prevalent and could see a big indent into the housing crisis as office developments and business parks are less required and will be slowly sold off for housing/apartment developments. You'd imagine floor space would beocme bigger to allow for the need for office space in the home.

I think we may also see a bit more flexibility in work hours (depending on job etc).

Not sure how the social aspect will play out though and the effect on mental health.
 

shmmeee

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I think we are seeing a bit of a long term change.

I reckon as we get used to wearing masks in shops etc it will become a common thing as it is in Asia.

WFH will be more prevalent and could see a big indent into the housing crisis as office developments and business parks are less required and will be slowly sold off for housing/apartment developments. You'd imagine floor space would beocme bigger to allow for the need for office space in the home.

I think we may also see a bit more flexibility in work hours (depending on job etc).

Not sure how the social aspect will play out though and the effect on mental health.
Fair point about office to resi converting actually. Permitted Development rights already allow a lot of offices to be switched to resi And I think they’re loosening it up further. Was talking to a developer about how 20 years ago all his work was making big houses into offices now it’s turning them all back again!

Not sure how that plays with people wanting more space and less rural though. If we were a communist country I’d be pushing places like round by The Aardvark to convert back to houses and keep the office space in city centres. I reckon there’ll be a few out of town tech parks like the one I work at in trouble though. Not really suitable for a direct conversion and I expect most of their tenants will be tech savvy and happy to WFH.

Just reading an article about telehealth in the States and how it’s exploded during lockdown. Saying doctors hope making it easy to see a doctor at home or on a break from work might lead more people to visit over smaller things. Apparently most missed appointments are minor things people decide it’s not worth the hassle of visiting for at the last minute.

If we end up driving less, ordering online more, making healthcare more accessible that’s no bad thing. I do wonder if heating and powering lots of houses is less economical and environmentally friendly than one office, but on balance I’d guess it’s a win.
 

Brighton Sky Blue

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Was speaking to the missus about how it hasn't really felt like being on holiday because we've been inside remote teaching for months. Weirdly going out for long walks is about the only way we can relax as opposed to staying in which has sent us a bit stir crazy. Really enjoyed going to the pub so far, particularly putting money back into places that aren't Spoons
 
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wingy

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Fair point about office to resi converting actually. Permitted Development rights already allow a lot of offices to be switched to resi And I think they’re loosening it up further. Was talking to a developer about how 20 years ago all his work was making big houses into offices now it’s turning them all back again!

Not sure how that plays with people wanting more space and less rural though. If we were a communist country I’d be pushing places like round by The Aardvark to convert back to houses and keep the office space in city centres. I reckon there’ll be a few out of town tech parks like the one I work at in trouble though. Not really suitable for a direct conversion and I expect most of their tenants will be tech savvy and happy to WFH.

Just reading an article about telehealth in the States and how it’s exploded during lockdown. Saying doctors hope making it easy to see a doctor at home or on a break from work might lead more people to visit over smaller things. Apparently most missed appointments are minor things people decide it’s not worth the hassle of visiting for at the last minute.

If we end up driving less, ordering online more, making healthcare more accessible that’s no bad thing. I do wonder if heating and powering lots of houses is less economical and environmentally friendly than one office, but on balance I’d guess it’s a win.
The last bit is like reflection of the last 40 yrs or so where the home and policy have evolved.
Solution , don't quote me .
Keep more poeple together in the home environment .
1 parent worker 1 salary ..
More poeple living together.
 
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shmmeee

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The last bit is like reflection of the last 40 yrs or so where the home and policy have evolved.
Solution , don't quote me .
Keep more poeple together in the home environment .
1 parent worker 1 salary ..
More poeple living together.
A return to local communities all round would be amazing. I am conscious of the class divide here though, none of my working class friends worked from home, all of my middle class friends did.
 

Sky_Blue_Daz

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Works been brilliant ,I work as a carer in the nhs. I work with children that have life limiting health conditions however we’ve been asked to support other nursing departments so I’ve been working with community nurses and an adult continence team . Learnt lots of new skills and met some lovely people
 

bringbackrattles

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My sister is going to her hairdressers today first time since before lockdown. She says for some reason she feels nervous, and doesn't know why ?
Must be due to the weeks and weeks stuck in her house, and being scared of picking up the virus. Another side effect to lockdown I reckon, as I too felt edgy going back to work and mixing again,
But am okay now.
 

clint van damme

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My sister is going to her hairdressers today first time since before lockdown. She says for some reason she feels nervous, and doesn't know why ?
Must be due to the weeks and weeks stuck in her house, and being scared of picking up the virus. Another side effect to lockdown I reckon, as I too felt edgy going back to work and mixing again,
But am okay now.
my is a hairdresser B, the measures they've put in place are very stringent.
My wife has to wear a visor, unfortunately it's see through, a welders mask would be better!
 

bringbackrattles

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I got a taxi the other day and the driver wore a mask and after I paid the fare in cash, he sprayed his hands with sanatiser. Like garlic bread, it's the future ! 😅
 
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bringbackrattles

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When cash goes I'll be in a mess. Do everything in cash. I've got a credit card which I loathe, so looks like I'll have to get used to using a card again. Good article online recently by someone saying we should all be out on the streets demonstrating against a cashless society. Saying it's a hidden agenda by the government and the banks, as when cash is eradicated the banks take total control of our money etc. Sinister intent !
 

clint van damme

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When cash goes I'll be in a mess. Do everything in cash. I've got a credit card which I loathe, so looks like I'll have to get used to using a card again. Good article online recently by someone saying we should all be out on the streets demonstrating against a cashless society. Saying it's a hidden agenda by the government and the banks, as when cash is eradicated the banks take total control of our money etc. Sinister intent !
I think it's unworkable to be honest to I'm sure they'll find a way if they really want to.
 
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clint van damme

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They always do ! We're being turned into robots. Do this and do that listen to our leaders blah blah blah. My late parents generation would tell them to piss off ! 😣
my wife took payments by a mix of cash and card reader prior to Covid but it's all gone bank transfer now though she had one old dear last week who washed 2 fivers and put them in a zip lock bag to pay her bless her!
 
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bringbackrattles

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my wife took payments by a mix of cash and card reader prior to Covid but it's all gone bank transfer now though she had one old dear last week who washed 2 fivers and put them in a zip lock bag to pay her bless her!
An elderly customer of mine pays me in coins. She counts it out as well. She's a lovely old lady so I just say " No of course I don't mind, I collect coins anyway. " Makes me home made cake to take with me, so worth it ! ☺
 
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shmmeee

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When cash goes I'll be in a mess. Do everything in cash. I've got a credit card which I loathe, so looks like I'll have to get used to using a card again. Good article online recently by someone saying we should all be out on the streets demonstrating against a cashless society. Saying it's a hidden agenda by the government and the banks, as when cash is eradicated the banks take total control of our money etc. Sinister intent !
Mate. Currency literally requires a government to control it, that’s how it works. Don’t worry, the illuminati aren’t going to steal your tips 😁

Would like to see a decentralised system not reliant on banks though, like bitcoin.